Respect and Responsibility: Part 8

The development project as an attempt to bring all societies “forward,” along a supposed continuum, is unjustifiable.  And yet there is much important work to be done that looks very much like, and is even called, “development.”  Without development theory as a guiding framework, why do we do this work?  I have tried to explain the philosophical underpinnings for Tandana’s work, describing how they led to the work we do, but even more importantly, to the way in which we do this work. 

Español

Français

In a series of posts you will find here, I illustrate how the principles on which Tandana is founded play out in concrete application through discussions of my own experiences as well as those of community members and volunteers who have worked with Tandana.  We see how reaching out to others with a personal approach leads, both in theory and in practice, to a world that is, incrementally, more peaceful and more just.  This personal approach could serve not only as impetus for one organization’s work but also to transform the character and effects of other groups seeking right relationship with others.  This is the eighth in a series of 10 posts that will give insight into both the philosophical reasons and the concrete effects of reaching out to others with a personal approach.  

If you missed Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7, read them here.

Respect

One of the moral obligations that arises from face-to-face interactions is respect for the other.125 Respect requires showing “due regard for the feelings, wishes, rights, or traditions of others.”126 When we recognize absolute otherness through the face of the other, we must show regard for the other’s feelings, wishes, rights, and traditions, as we cannot fit them into an overarching schema through which we could judge them. The term respect, however, is used in several different ways based on differential power relations, as something commanded, something earned, or something accorded. Respect, in the sense of heeding the greater power of a figure of authority can reinforce hierarchical dynamics, whereas respect accorded to those in subordinate positions, which insists on treating them as equals, can weaken the sway of power. As Levinas argues, “The face speaks to me and thereby invites me to a relation incommensurate with a power exercised.”127 Choosing to accept this relation, we limit the working of power. Respecting the alterity of the other, we relate “to what is different not by denying one’s deepest convictions but by encasing them in a prior commitment to a humility that trumps the certainties of reason or revelation and in doing so denies space to power.”128 We look at “the unfamiliar from a perspective that does not a priori presume its provisionality,” but rather recognizes its possibility for coherence even if understanding it proves to be difficult.129 This perspective “places the onus on the comprehending subject and not on the studied object [and] . . . suggests a limitation on our knowledge without predicating this on the essentiality of the object.”130 Respect asks us to seek to understand, rather than expect the other to fit herself into our familiar categories.

Respect for people and their cultures is one of Tandana’s core values. We try to keep respect at the forefront of our minds, by honoring the ability of the community members we work with to define their own priorities, to envision ways to reach their goals, and to act together to make positive change. The projects that Tandana supports are initiated and designed by the communities. Using their own decision-making processes, such as general assemblies and the delegation of certain details to leadership councils, communities define their priorities and make plans for how to achieve their goals. Then they submit proposals to Tandana, and we discuss whether and how we can collaborate. In a few cases, such as the scholarship program and the health care program in Ecuador, and the women’s leadership workshops in Mali, Tandana may propose an idea and seek feedback from local residents. These kinds of programs are organized by Tandana, but we only undertake them if there is real enthusiasm from community members, and we seek local input in their design. Moussa Tembiné, Tandana’s Mali Program Manager lauded this approach, saying, “The great success of Tandana in Mali, for me, is that it is the people of the village who initiate their own projects and the foundation accompanies them.”131 Luis Chicaiza, a teacher in Cutambi, Ecuador, explained, “The community leaders have begun to think about how to provide for their needs and to see Tandana as complementary to their efforts.”132 As Housseyni Pamateck, Tandana’s Local Supervisor in Mali, said, “The beneficiaries propose the activities they can’t do all on their own, and the foundation completes what is still needed, and they work together. That is what has really encouraged me. It’s rare to find an NGO that works like that.”133 It is so rare, in fact, that Samba Tembiné, an elder from Kansongho, Mali at first could not imagine that Tandana would actually show respect. He explained, “At first, I was against it, but after the first group visited, I understood that these foreigners are different from the others, because everything they have done has been with our agreement, and they have asked us about everything with the greatest respect.”134

Hear more: 

Respect also calls Tandana representatives to learn about, honor, and adapt to the various cultures that our community partners identify as their own. In Quichinche, Ecuador, a gift of food is an important sign of friendship, representing the hard work that went into cultivating the crops. Good manners call for eating it with gusto and taking any leftovers home with you. I have heard of other medical volunteer groups who have refused to eat food offered by the community, caring little about the offense they were causing. Tandana staff teach the volunteers to accept gifts of food with a smile and take any leftovers with them.

Maria Esther Manrrique, a nurse at the Gualsaqui Health Center, explained of Tandana volunteers, “Often for the foreigners, it is unfamiliar food, something they have never eaten. But they accept it with a smile, and they never get angry or look like they are in a bad mood. That gives the community more confidence, so they talk more openly and share food.”135 Tandana staff and volunteers try to participate in local customs and practices as appropriate. As Moussa Tembiné explains, “for the Tandana Foundation, there is no superiority. The volunteers agree to fit in to the community’s culture. That is what gives confidence to the people.”136 Respect means treating people with dignity. Segundo Moreta of Rey Loma, Ecuador, said, “Thank you Tandana for restoring people’s dignity.”137

Practicing respect is particularly important for those who occupy positions of greater power in global hierarchies. Those in positions of lesser privilege tend to learn respect, in the sense of respecting an authority, as a matter of survival or as a strategic tool, whereas those in more powerful locations must make a moral decision to accord respect and “deny space to power.” Tandana’s Values Statement acknowledges the different levels of need for respect across hierarchies, affirming, “We recognize the need to pay special attention to cultures that have historically been devalued,” and “We support the efforts of indigenous peoples to reclaim, express pride in, and strengthen their cultures.”138 In practice, this respect plays out in expressions of interest in and appreciation for aspects of local knowledge, ways of doing things, histories, experiences, and cultural expressions. Learning to make bread or bracelets, following the lead of local expert masons on building projects, learning local languages, inquiring about customs and ceremonies, joining in celebrations, asking questions about hosts’ past experiences, learning to draw water from a well, learning how to milk a cow, and simply paying close attention are all ways that Tandana visitors show respect for their hosts’ cultures, which have traditionally been devalued. Esther Perugachi from Cutambi, Ecuador, who taught a group of Tandana volunteers how to make bread, bracelets, and scarves, said, “The day we made bread, the day we were here making scarves and bracelets, I really felt good. People were asking me questions, as if I were someone important.”139 It is a tragic injustice that leaves Esther typically feeling as though she were not someone important, and that history makes demonstrating her importance to her even more urgent.

Hear more:

Respect for cultures, knowledge, techniques, and experiences is valuable, but ultimately respect for the people to whom they belong is more important. I learned this lesson through a mistake I made in working with the village of Kansongho, Mali. Local leaders had proposed planting a fruit orchard, which would need to be enclosed to prevent livestock from devouring the young trees. They had requested funds for a chain- link fence to keep the animals out. Wanting to valorize traditional technologies and ways of doing things, I proposed that instead we build a stone wall to protect the orchard, and village leaders agreed. A Tandana volunteer group visited Kansongho and worked alongside residents to build the wall. Local men blasted enormous stones from the bedrock and rolled them into place, while volunteers and local youth carried smaller stones. After several days of work, the wall was complete and the young trees were planted inside.

It fit in perfectly with the aesthetic of the village, matching the walls that residents had around their compounds. Within a month, however, goats had climbed over the wall, and in the next rainy season, a violent storm blew over one section. After that, we replaced the wall with a chain-link fence, which has protected the garden for eight years. Instead of listening respectfully to local leaders’ plan, I had tried to follow my
 own image of what respecting their traditions would look like. More important, of course, is actually listening with respect to people.

Although global hierarchies require differential attention to respect, Tandana seeks to build relationships that are mutually-respectful, endeavoring to earn, rather than command, its partners’ respect. According to volunteers, this effort is successful. Volunteer J.P. Nelson reported that Tandana “enjoys massive respect and loyalty from the people in its community.”140 Ashley, a volunteer from Massachusetts, recalled, “Tandana goes beyond just the actions of service by kindling relationships between cultures, allowing both the volunteers and the people in the community to form mutual respect and admiration for one another.”141

Responsibility

The moral demands of the face and of promise-keeping call us to responsibility.142 Levinas explains of the face, “instead of offending my freedom it calls me to responsibility and founds it.”143 The look of the other, “appeals to my responsibility and consecrates my freedom as responsibility and gift of self.”144 To hear the other’s call is “to posit oneself as responsible.”145 Responsibility is responding to another’s need or request out of a position of freedom. It is also responding to the trust of another and maintaining self-constancy through keeping one’s word. Ricoeur explains that the moral obligation of the promise is “to respond to the trust that the other places in my faithfulness.”146 He elaborates:

Self-constancy is for each person that manner of conducting himself or herself so that others can count on that person. Because someone is counting on me, I am accountable for my actions before another. The term “responsibility” unites both meanings: “counting on” and “being accountable for.” It unites them, adding to them the idea of a response to the question “Where are you?” asked by another who needs me. This response is the following: “Here I am!” a response that is a statement of self-constancy.147

Responsibility involves responding to the other’s call as well as being accountable–being someone another can count on. By honoring our commitments, we become selves with identities constant through time. Ricoeur argues:

The question becomes: “Who am I, so inconstant, that notwithstanding you can count on me?” The gap between the question which engulfs the narrative imagination and the answer of the subject who has been made responsible by the expectation of the other becomes the secret break at the very heart of commitment.148

Responsibility allows us not only to meet others’ needs but also to be truly ourselves. Responsibility is another core value of Tandana’s approach. In a basic sense, practicing this value is a matter of responding to one another, and being ready to follow through on what we agree to do. For Tandana, responsibility also means continuing to collaborate until a project is complete and following up afterwards to see what its effects are and whether further support is needed. Sometimes in a drive to foster independence, NGOs have policies about staying only very briefly in one area. In their haste, however, they sometimes fail to support the communities in truly taking ownership over the projects. As Moussa Tembiné said, “The Tandana Foundation is not seen as an NGO. NGOs come. If it is to build a well, they make the well and they go away. If it is a grain bank or a mill, they give it and they go away. Two or three years later, the project is no longer working.”149 Tandana stays in relationship with the community, ensuring that local leaders are equipped to manage the project. In Ecuador, Tandana has collaborated with several communities on major building projects, like a new community center and a new school building. Budget limitations do not allow us to take on a large project all at once, but we explain that we can help in small phases. Both Tandana and the communities have stayed focused and completed the projects, step by step. Luis Chicaiza, a teacher in Cutambi, Ecuador, pointed out, “Your philosophy is to complete a project, not leave it incomplete. I think that is the advantage that you have over other organizations.”150 Matias Perugachi, manager of the UCINQUI native tree nursery in Achupallas, Ecuador, explained, “The Tandana Foundation isn’t like other organizations, public or private, that maybe help one time and leave. The Tandana Foundation has done a thorough and long- term follow-up, so that things turn out for the best.”151

Hear more: 

Community partners who are in relationship with Tandana also demonstrate responsibility. Fabian Pinsag, president of Muenala, Ecuador, for example, explained, “It’s one thing to ask for help and another to provide follow up and show the responsibility of the community. We have planted trees with Tandana’s help, and we put up barbed wire so the animals won’t damage them.”152 Ando Tembiné of Kansongho, Mali also expressed the importance of following through during the closing of a workshop on how to make cook stoves, saying:

We just spent 8 days together without problems, learning how to make tools that will allow us not only to reduce excessive logging in our land, but also to reduce the workload for our women. Thanks to God, all is well that ends well. However, we must continue to work towards our goal. Each one of us present here must continue to manufacture a lot of stoves and educate our fellow villagers on how to use the stoves.153

Scholarship recipient Soraya Bolaños of La Joya, Ecuador, wrote, “I won’t let you down; I will demonstrate my responsibility and great appreciation.”154

Rolando Quilumbango

Rolando Quilumbango of Panecillo, Ecuador, also a scholarship recipient, affirmed:

What I have learned this year and that will help me go forward is that I should take advantage of the opportunity that I am given to study and because of that I make an effort every day because I don’t want to betray those who support me. . . . Also, it helps me to be more responsible in my homework because I don’t want to lose this opportunity that the Foundation is giving me.155

Mutual responsibility informs the relationships that Tandana creates.

124 In The Tandana Foundation, Ten Years of Joining Hands and Changing Lives, YouTube video, September 25, 2017 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=374&v=bNgqTUr_N0s).

125 Arrow 20 on the diagram.
1

26 Oxford Living English Dictionaries, https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/respect, accessed June 16, 2018.

127 Levinas, 198.

128 Mehta, xi.

129 Mehta, 214.

130 Mehta, 68.

131 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

132 Ibid.

133 Ibid.

134 Ibid.

135 Ibid.

136 Ibid.

137 Ibid.

138 The Tandana Foundation “Mission & Values,” accessed June 16, 2018, (tandanafoundation.org/mission_and_values.html).

139 Unpublished interview, April 12, 2016.

140 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

141 Ibid.

142 Arrows 21 and 22 in the diagram.

143 Levinas, 203.

144 Ibid., 208.

145 Ibid., 215.

146 Ricoeur, 124.

147 Ibid., 168, emphases in original.

148 Ibid.

149 Ibid.

150 Ibid.

151 Ibid.

152 Ibid.

Español

El Respecto y La Responsibilidad: Parte 8

El proyecto de desarrollo como un intento de llevar a todas las sociedades “hacia adelante” a lo largo de un supuesto continuo, es injustificable. Y sin embargo, hay mucho trabajo importante por hacer que se parece mucho, e incluso se llama, “desarrollo”. Sin la teoría del desarrollo como marco guía, ¿por qué hacemos este trabajo? He tratado de explicar los fundamentos filosóficos del trabajo de Tandana, describiendo cómo conducen al trabajo que hacemos, pero más importante aún, a la forma en que hacemos este trabajo.

En una serie de publicaciones que encontrará aquí, ilustre cómo los principios en los que se basa Tandana se llevan a cabo en una aplicación concreta a través de discusiones sobre mis propias experiencias y las de los miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios que han trabajado con Tandana. Vemos cómo llegar a otros con un enfoque personal conduce, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica, a un mundo que es, de manera incremental, más pacífico y más justo. Este enfoque personal podría servir no solo como un impulso para el trabajo de una organización, sino también para transformar el carácter y los efectos de otros grupos que buscan una relación correcta con los demás. Este es el octavo de una serie de 10 publicaciones que dará una idea de las razones filosóficas y los efectos concretos de acercarse a los demás con un enfoque personal.

Si te perdiste la Parte 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, y 7, léelas aquí.

El Respeto

Una de las obligaciones morales que surgen de las interacciones cara a cara es el respeto por el otro.125 El respeto requiere mostrar “el debido respeto por los sentimientos, deseos, derechos o tradiciones de los demás”. 126 Cuando reconocemos la otredad absoluta a través del rostro. Por el otro, debemos mostrar respeto a los sentimientos, deseos, derechos y tradiciones, ya que no podemos encajarlos en un esquema general mediante el cual podríamos juzgarlos. El término respeto, sin embargo, se usa de varias maneras diferentes basadas en relaciones de poder diferenciales, como algo ordenado, algo ganado o algo otorgado. El respeto, en el sentido de prestar atención al mayor poder de una figura de autoridad, puede reforzar las dinámicas jerárquicas, mientras que el respeto otorgado a aquellos en posiciones subordinadas, que insiste en tratarlos como iguales, puede debilitar el dominio del poder. Como sostiene Levinas, “el rostro me habla y, por lo tanto, me invita a una relación inconmensurable con un poder ejercido”. 127 Al elegir aceptar esta relación, limitamos el trabajo del poder. Respetando la alteridad del otro, nos relacionamos “con lo que es diferente, no negando las convicciones más profundas, sino encerrándolos en un compromiso previo con una humildad que hace triunfar “las certezas de la razón o la revelación y, al hacerlo, niegan el espacio al poder”.128

Miramos a “lo desconocido desde una perspectiva que no presupone a priori su provisionalidad”, sino que más bien reconoce su posibilidad de coherencia, incluso si la comprensión resulta difícil.129 Esta perspectiva “coloca la responsabilidad en el sujeto comprensivo y no en El objeto estudiado [y]. . . sugiere una limitación en nuestro conocimiento sin predecir esto en la esencialidad del objeto ”. 130 El respeto nos pide que busquemos entender, en lugar de esperar que el otro se adapte a nuestras categorías familiares. El respeto por las personas y sus culturas es uno de los valores fundamentales de Tandana. Tratamos de mantener el respeto a la vanguardia de nuestras mentes, respetando la capacidad de los miembros de la comunidad con los que trabajamos para definir sus propias prioridades, imaginar formas de alcanzar sus objetivos y actuar juntos para lograr un cambio positivo. Los proyectos que apoya Tandana son iniciados y diseñados por las comunidades. Al usar sus propios procesos de toma de decisiones, como las asambleas generales y la delegación de ciertos detalles a los consejos de liderazgo, las comunidades definen sus prioridades y hacen planes para lograr sus objetivos. Luego envían propuestas a Tandana y discutimos si podemos colaborar y cómo. En algunos casos, como el programa de becas y el programa de atención médica en Ecuador, y los talleres sobre liderazgo de mujeres en Mali, Tandana puede proponer una idea y buscar la opinión de los residentes locales. Tandana organiza este tipo de programas, pero solo los emprendemos si hay un entusiasmo real por parte de los miembros de la comunidad, y buscamos aportes locales en su diseño. Moussa Tembiné, Gerente del Programa Malí de Tandana, alabó este enfoque y dijo: “El gran éxito de Tandana en Malí, para mí, es que son las personas de la aldea quienes inician sus propios proyectos y la fundación los acompaña “. 131 Luis Chicaiza, maestro en Cutambi, Ecuador, explicó: “Los líderes de la comunidad han comenzado a pensar en cómo cubrir sus necesidades y ver a Tandana como un complemento de sus esfuerzos”.132 Como dijo Housseyni Pamateck, supervisora local de Tandana en Mali, “los beneficiarios proponen las actividades que no pueden hacer por su cuenta, y la fundación completa lo que aún se necesita y trabajan juntos. Eso es lo que realmente me ha animado. Es raro encontrar una ONG que funcione así “.133 De hecho, es tan raro que Samba Tembiné, un anciano de Kansongho, Mali, al principio no pudiera imaginar que Tandana en realidad mostraría respeto. Él explicó: “Al principio, estaba en contra, pero después de la primera visita del grupo, entendí que estos extranjeros son diferentes de los demás, porque todo lo que han hecho ha sido nuestro acuerdo, y nos han preguntado sobre todo con el mayor respeto. ”134

Escuchar mas:

El respeto también llama a los representantes de Tandana a aprender, honrar y adaptarse a las diversas culturas que nuestros socios comunitarios identifican como propias. En Quichinche, Ecuador, un regalo de comida es un importante signo de amistad, que representa el arduo trabajo que se llevó a cabo para cultivar los cultivos. Los buenos modales requieren comer con gusto y llevarse las sobras a casa. He oído hablar de otros grupos de voluntarios médicos que se han negado a comer los alimentos ofrecidos por la comunidad, sin preocuparse por la ofensa que estaban causando. El personal de Tandana enseña a los voluntarios a aceptar obsequios de comida con una sonrisa y se llevan las sobras.

María Esther Manrrique, enfermera del Centro de Salud Gualsaqui, explicó a los voluntarios de Tandana: “A menudo, para los extranjeros, es una comida desconocida, algo que nunca han comido. Pero lo aceptan con una sonrisa, y nunca parecen estar enojados o de mal humor. Eso le da a la comunidad más confianza, por lo que hablan más abiertamente y comparten alimentos ”.135 El personal y los voluntarios de Tandana tratan de participar en las costumbres y prácticas locales según sea apropiado. Como explica Moussa Tembiné, “para la Fundación Tandana, no hay superioridad. Los voluntarios acuerdan encajar en la cultura de la comunidad. Eso es lo que da confianza a las personas ”.136 Respeto significa tratar a las personas con dignidad. Segundo Moreta de Rey Loma, Ecuador, dijo: “Gracias Tandana por restaurar la dignidad de las personas”.137

Practicar el respeto es particularmente importante para quienes ocupan puestos de mayor poder en las jerarquías globales. Los que ocupan puestos de menor privilegio tienden a aprender el respeto, en el sentido de respetar una autoridad, como una cuestión de supervivencia o como una herramienta estratégica, mientras que los que se encuentran en lugares más poderosos deben tomar una decisión moral de otorgar respeto y “negar el espacio al poder”. . ” La Declaración de Valores de Tandana reconoce los diferentes niveles de necesidad de respeto entre las jerarquías, afirmando: “Reconocemos la necesidad de prestar especial atención a las culturas que históricamente han sido devaluadas”, y “Apoyamos los esfuerzos de los pueblos indígenas para reclamar, expresar orgullo, y fortalecer sus culturas ”.138 En la práctica, este respeto se manifiesta en expresiones de interés y aprecio por aspectos del conocimiento local, formas de hacer las cosas, historias, experiencias y expresiones culturales. Aprender a hacer pan o brazaletes, seguir el liderazgo de expertos locales en proyectos de construcción, aprender idiomas locales, preguntar sobre las costumbres y ceremonias, participar en celebraciones, hacer preguntas sobre las experiencias pasadas de los anfitriones, aprender a extraer agua de un pozo, aprender cómo ordeñar una vaca, y simplemente prestando toda la atención es la manera en que los visitantes de Tandana muestran respeto por las culturas de sus anfitriones, que tradicionalmente han sido devaluadas. Esther Perugachi de Cutambi, Ecuador, quien enseñó a un grupo de voluntarios de Tandana a hacer pan, brazaletes y bufandas, dijo: “El día que hicimos pan, el día que estuvimos aquí haciendo bufandas y brazaletes, realmente me sentí bien. Las personas me hacían preguntas, como si yo fuera alguien importante ”.139 Es una injusticia trágica que hace que Esther se sienta como si no fuera alguien importante y que la historia hace que demostrar su importancia sea aún más urgente.

Escuchar mas:

El respeto por las culturas, los conocimientos, las técnicas y las experiencias es valioso, pero en última instancia, el respeto por las personas a las que pertenecen es más importante. Aprendí esta lección a través de un error que cometí al trabajar con el pueblo de Kansongho, Mali. Los líderes locales propusieron plantar un huerto frutal, que debería incluirse para evitar que el ganado devore a los árboles jóvenes. Habían solicitado fondos para una cerca de alambre para mantener a los animales fuera. Queriendo valorizar las tecnologías tradicionales y las formas de hacer las cosas, propuse que en su lugar construyéramos un muro de piedra para proteger el huerto, y los líderes de las aldeas estuvieron de acuerdo. Un grupo de voluntarios de Tandana visitó Kansongho y trabajó junto a los residentes para construir el muro. Los hombres locales lanzaron enormes piedras desde el lecho de roca y las colocaron en su lugar, mientras que los voluntarios y los jóvenes locales llevaron piedras más pequeñas.

Después de varios días de trabajo, el muro se completó y los árboles jóvenes se plantaron en el interior. Encajaba perfectamente con la estética del pueblo, combinando con las paredes que los residentes tenían alrededor de sus complejos. Sin embargo, en un mes, las cabras habían trepado la pared, y en la siguiente temporada de lluvias, una tormenta violenta sopló sobre una sección. Después de eso, reemplazamos el muro con una cerca de alambre, que ha protegido el jardín durante ocho años. En lugar de escuchar respetuosamente el plan de los líderes locales, traté de seguir mi 139 imagen propia de lo que sería respetar sus tradiciones. Lo más importante, por supuesto, es escuchar con respeto a las personas.

Aunque las jerarquías globales requieren una atención diferencial al respeto, Tandana busca establecer relaciones que sean mutuamente respetuosas, esforzándose por ganar, en lugar de comandar, el respeto de sus socios. Según los voluntarios, este esfuerzo es exitoso. El voluntario J.P. Nelson informó que Tandana “goza del respeto y la lealtad masivos de las personas de su comunidad”. Ashley, una voluntaria de Massachusetts, recordó: “Tandana va más allá de las acciones de servicio al entablar relaciones entre culturas, permitiendo que tanto los voluntarios como las personas de la comunidad se generen respeto y admiración mutua”. 141

Responsabilidad

Las exigencias morales del rostro y del cumplimiento de las promesas nos llaman a la responsabilidad.142 Levinas explica el rostro: “en lugar de ofender mi libertad, me llama a la responsabilidad y la funda”.143 El aspecto del otro “apela a mí la responsabilidad y consagra mi libertad como responsabilidad y don de sí mismo ”144. Escuchar el llamado del otro es “postularse como responsable”.145 La responsabilidad es responder a la necesidad o solicitud de otra persona desde una posición de libertad. También responde a la confianza de otro y mantiene la constancia de sí mismo a través de la palabra de uno. Ricoeur explica que la obligación moral de la promesa es “responder a la confianza que los demás ponen en mi fidelidad”. 146

El Elabora:

La auto-constancia es para cada persona esa forma de conducirse para que otros puedan contar con esa persona. Porque alguien cuenta conmigo, soy responsable de mis acciones antes que de otra. El término “responsabilidad” une ambos significados: “contar con” y “ser responsable de”. Los une, agregándoles la idea de una respuesta a la pregunta “¿Dónde estás?”, Preguntado por otro que me necesita. Esta respuesta es la siguiente: “¡Aquí estoy!”, Una respuesta que es una declaración de constancia propia.147

La responsabilidad implica responder a la llamada del otro, además de ser responsable: ser alguien con quien otra persona puede contar. Al cumplir nuestros compromisos, nos convertimos en seres con identidades constantes a lo largo del tiempo. Ricoeur argumenta:

La pregunta se convierte en: “¿Quién soy yo, tan inconstante, que puedes contar conmigo?” La brecha entre la pregunta que envuelve la imaginación narrativa y la respuesta del sujeto que ha sido responsabilizado por la expectativa del otro se convierte en la cuestión de ruptura secreta en el corazón mismo del compromiso.148

La responsabilidad nos permite no solo satisfacer las necesidades de los demás, sino también ser verdaderamente nosotros mismos.

La responsabilidad es otro valor fundamental del enfoque de Tandana. En un sentido básico, la práctica de este valor es una cuestión de responder unos a otros, y estar listos para cumplir con lo que acordamos hacer. Para Tandana, la responsabilidad también significa continuar colaborando hasta que un proyecto esté completo y realizar un seguimiento posterior para ver cuáles son sus efectos y si se necesita más apoyo. A veces, en un intento por fomentar la independencia, las ONG tienen políticas sobre quedarse solo muy brevemente en un área. Sin embargo, en su prisa, a veces no logran apoyar a las comunidades para que realmente se apropien de los proyectos. Como dijo Moussa Tembiné, “La Fundación Tandana no se considera una ONG. Las ONG vienen. Si se trata de construir un pozo, lo hacen y se van. Si es un banco de grano o un molino, lo dan y se van. Dos o tres años después, el proyecto ya no está funcionando ” 149. Tandana se mantiene en relación con la comunidad, asegurando que los líderes locales estén equipados para administrar el proyecto. En Ecuador, Tandana ha colaborado con varias comunidades en importantes proyectos de construcción, como un nuevo centro comunitario y un nuevo edificio escolar. Las limitaciones presupuestarias no nos permiten abordar un proyecto grande de una vez, pero explicamos que podemos ayudar en pequeñas fases. Tanto Tandana como las comunidades se mantuvieron enfocadas y completaron los proyectos, paso a paso. Luis Chicaiza, profesor en Cutambi, Ecuador, señaló: “Tu filosofía es completar un proyecto, no dejarlo incompleto. Creo que esa es la ventaja que tienen sobre otras organizaciones “.150 Matías Perugachi, gerente del vivero de árboles nativos de UCINQUI en Achupallas, Ecuador, explicó: “La Fundación Tandana no es como otras organizaciones, públicas o privadas, que quizás ayuden una vez y se vayan. La Fundación Tandana ha realizado un seguimiento exhaustivo y a largo plazo, para que las cosas salgan mejor “. 151

Escuchar mas:

Los socios comunitarios que están en relación con Tandana también demuestran responsabilidad. Fabián Pinsag, presidente de Muenala, Ecuador, por ejemplo, explicó: “Una cosa es pedir ayuda y otra dar seguimiento y mostrar la responsabilidad de la comunidad. Hemos plantado árboles con la ayuda de Tandana, y colocamos alambre de púas para que los animales no los dañen ”.152 Ando Tembiné de Kansongho, Mali también expresó la importancia de seguir adelante durante el cierre de un taller sobre cómo hacer cocinas. , diciendo:

Acabamos de pasar 8 días juntos sin problemas, aprendiendo a hacer herramientas que nos permitirán no solo reducir el registro excesivo en nuestra tierra, sino también reducir la carga de trabajo para nuestras mujeres. Gracias a Dios, todo bien acaba bien. Sin embargo, debemos continuar trabajando hacia nuestra meta. Cada uno de los presentes aquí debe continuar fabricando una gran cantidad de estufas y educar a nuestros aldeanos sobre cómo usar las estufas.153

La ganadora de la beca Soraya Bolaños de La Joya, Ecuador, escribió: “No los decepcionaré; Demostraré mi responsabilidad y gran aprecio ”. 154

Rolando Quilumbango

Rolando Quilumbango de Panecillo, Ecuador, también becario, afirmó:

Lo que aprendí este año y que me ayudará a seguir adelante es que debo aprovechar la oportunidad que tengo para estudiar y, por eso, hago un esfuerzo todos los días porque no quiero traicionar a quienes me apoyan. . . . . Además, me ayuda a ser más responsable en mi tarea porque no quiero perder esta oportunidad que me brinda la Fundación.155

La responsabilidad mutua informa las relaciones que Tandana crea.

124 In The Tandana Foundation, Ten Years of Joining Hands and Changing Lives, YouTube video, September 25, 2017 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=374&v=bNgqTUr_N0s).

125 Arrow 20 on the diagram.
1

26 Oxford Living English Dictionaries, https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/respect, accessed June 16, 2018.

127 Levinas, 198.

128 Mehta, xi.

129 Mehta, 214.

130 Mehta, 68.

131 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

132 Ibid.

133 Ibid.

134 Ibid.

135 Ibid.

136 Ibid.

137 Ibid.

138 The Tandana Foundation “Mission & Values,” accessed June 16, 2018, (tandanafoundation.org/mission_and_values.html).

139 Unpublished interview, April 12, 2016.

140 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

141 Ibid.

142 Arrows 21 and 22 in the diagram.

143 Levinas, 203.

144 Ibid., 208.

145 Ibid., 215.

146 Ricoeur, 124.

147 Ibid., 168, emphases in original.

148 Ibid.

149 Ibid.

150 Ibid.

151 Ibid.

152 Ibid.

Français

Le Respect et Responsabilité: Partie 7

Le projet de développement comme tentative de «faire avancer» toutes les sociétés dans un continuum supposé est injustifiable. Et pourtant, il y a beaucoup de travail important à faire qui ressemble beaucoup au “développement”. Sans théorie du développement comme cadre directeur, pourquoi faisons-nous ce travail? J’ai essayé d’expliquer les fondements philosophiques du travail de Tandana, en décrivant comment ils conduisaient au travail que nous faisons, mais surtout, à la façon dont nous faisons ce travail.

Dans une série d’articles que vous trouverez ici, j’illustrerai comment les principes sur lesquels Tandana est fondée se concrétisent par des discussions sur mes propres expériences ainsi que sur celles de membres de la communauté et de bénévoles qui ont travaillé avec Tandana. Nous voyons comment le fait de s’approcher aux autres avec une approche personnelle conduit, à la fois en théorie et en pratique, à un monde de plus en plus pacifique et plus juste. Cette approche personnelle pourrait non seulement servir d’élan au travail d’une organisation, mais aussi transformer le caractère et les effets d’autres groupes à la recherche de bonnes relations avec les autres. Il s’agit de la huitième d’une série de 10 publications qui donneront un aperçu à la fois des raisons philosophiques et des effets concrets de la prise de contact avec une approche personnelle.

Si vous avez manqué la Partie 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 et 7, lisez-la ici.

Le Respect
L’une des obligations morales découlant des interactions face à face est le respect de l’autre125. Le respect exige de faire preuve de “respect pour les sentiments, les désirs, les droits ou les traditions des autres”. 126 Quand nous reconnaissons l’altérité absolue à travers le visage, d’autre part, nous devons faire preuve de respect envers les sentiments, les désirs, les droits et les traditions, car nous ne pouvons pas les intégrer à un système général nous permettant de les juger. Cependant, le terme «respect» est utilisé de différentes manières sur la base de relations de pouvoir différentielles, comme quelque chose ordonné, quelque chose gagné ou quelque chose récompensé. Le respect, au sens où l’on accorde plus d’attention au pouvoir d’une figure d’autorité, peut renforcer la dynamique hiérarchique, tandis que le respect accordé aux subordonnés, qui tient à les traiter comme des égaux, peut affaiblir l’emprise du pouvoir. Comme le soutient Levinas, “le visage me parle et m’invite donc à une relation incommensurable avec un pouvoir exercé”.127 En choisissant d’accepter cette relation, nous limitons le travail du pouvoir. En respectant l’altérité de l’autre, nous nous rapportons “à ce qui est différent, ne nions pas les convictions les plus profondes, mais les enfermions dans un engagement précédent avec une humilité qui nous fait réussir “les certitudes de la raison ou de la révélation et, en le faisant, ce nie toute place au pouvoir.”

Nous examinons «l’inconnu sous un angle qui ne présuppose pas a priori son caractère provisoire» mais reconnaît au contraire sa possibilité de cohérence, même si la compréhension est difficile129. Cette perspective «place la responsabilité sur le sujet qui comprend et non sur l’individu, non sur l’objet étudié [et] … suggère une limitation de nos connaissances sans la prédire dans l’essentialité de l’objet. ”

Le respect nous demande de chercher à comprendre, au lieu d’attendre que l’autre s’adapte à nos catégories familiales. Le respect des personnes et de leurs cultures est l’une des valeurs fondamentales de Tandana. Nous essayons de respecter nos priorités, en respectant la capacité des membres de la communauté avec lesquels nous travaillons de définir leurs propres priorités, d’imaginer des moyens d’atteindre leurs objectifs et d’agir ensemble pour réaliser des changements positifs. Les projets soutenus par Tandana sont initiés et conçus par les communautés. En utilisant leurs propres processus décisionnels, tels que les assemblées générales et en déléguant certains détails aux conseils de direction, les communautés définissent leurs priorités et élaborent des plans pour atteindre leurs objectifs. Ensuite, ils envoient des propositions à Tandana et nous discutons pour savoir si nous pouvons collaborer et comment. Dans certains cas, comme le programme de bourses d’études et le programme de soins de santé en Équateur, et les ateliers sur le leadership des femmes au Mali, Tandana peut proposer une idée et demander l’avis des résidents locaux. Tandana organise ce type de programme, mais nous ne le réalisons au moins que les membres de la communauté suscitent un réel enthousiasme et nous recherchons des contributions locales dans leur conception. Moussa Tembiné, responsable du programme Mali Tandana, a salué cette approche et a déclaré: “Le grand succès de Tandana au Mali, c’est que ce sont les habitants du village qui lancent leurs propres projets et la fondation les accompagne. ” 131 Luis Chicaiza, enseignant à Cutambi, en Équateur, a expliqué: “Les dirigeants de la communauté ont commencé à réfléchir à la manière de répondre à leurs besoins et voient Tandana comme un complément à leurs efforts.”132 Comme le dit Housseyni Pamateck, superviseur local de Tandana au Mali, “les bénéficiaires proposent des activités qu’ils ne peuvent pas mener seuls, et la fondation complète ce qui est encore nécessaire et travaillent ensemble. C’est ce qui m’a vraiment encouragé. C’est rare de trouver une ONG qui fonctionne de la sorte. “133 En fait, il est tellement rare que Samba Tembiné, un vieil homme de Kansongho, au Mali, ne puisse au début imaginer que Tandana montrerait du respect. Il a expliqué:” Au début, j’étais contre. , mais après la première visite du groupe, j’ai compris que ces étrangers étaient différents des autres, car tout ce qu’ils ont fait est notre accord, et ils nous ont posé des questions sur tout avec le plus grand respect. “134

Entendre plus:

Le respect appelle également les représentants de Tandana à apprendre, à honorer et à s’adapter aux diverses cultures que nos partenaires communautaires considèrent comme leurs cultures propres. À Quichinche, en Équateur, un cadeau de nourriture est un signe important d’amitié, ce qui représente le dur travail accompli pour cultiver les cultures. Les bonnes manières exigent de manger avec plaisir et de rapporter les restes à la maison. J’ai entendu parler d’autres groupes de volontaires médicaux qui ont refusé de manger la nourriture offerte par la communauté, sans se soucier de l’infraction qu’ils causaient. . Le personnel de Tandana apprend aux volontaires à accepter les cadeaux avec un sourire et à en retirer les restes.

María Esther Manrrique, infirmière au centre de santé de Gualsaqui, a expliqué aux volontaires de Tandana: “Souvent, pour les étrangers, il s’agit d’un aliment inconnu, quelque chose qu’ils n’ont jamais mangé auparavant. Mais ils l’acceptent avec un sourire et jamais ils semblent en colère ou de mauvaise humeur. Cela donne plus de confiance à la communauté, donc elle parle plus ouvertement et partage de la nourriture. ” Le personnel et les bénévoles de Tandana tentent de s’adapter aux coutumes et pratiques locales, selon le cas. Comme l’explique Moussa Tembiné, “pour la Fondation Tandana, il n’y a pas de supériorité. Les volontaires acceptent de s’intégrer à la culture de la communauté. C’est ce qui donne confiance aux gens. ” 136 Respecter signifie traiter les gens avec dignité. Segundo Moreta de Rey Loma, Équateur, a déclaré: “Merci Tandana d’avoir restauré la dignité de la population.”137 Pratiquer le respect est particulièrement important pour ceux qui occupent des positions plus puissantes dans les hiérarchies mondiales. Ceux qui occupent des postes moins privilégiés ont tendance à apprendre le respect, au sens de respecter une autorité, comme un moyen de survie ou un outil stratégique, tandis que ceux qui se trouvent dans des lieux plus puissants doivent prendre la décision morale de respecter. et “nier l’espace au pouvoir.” . ” La Déclaration de valeurs de Tandana reconnaît les différents niveaux de besoin de respect parmi les hiérarchies, déclarant: “Nous reconnaissons la nécessité d’accorder une attention particulière aux cultures qui ont été dévalorisées par le passé” et “Nous soutenons les efforts des peuples autochtones pour revendiquer, exprimer leur fierté et renforcer leurs cultures. “138 Dans la pratique, ce respect se manifeste par des expressions d’intérêt et de reconnaissance pour des aspects des connaissances locales, des façons de faire, des histoires, des expériences et des expressions culturelles. Apprendre à faire du pain ou des bracelets, suivre le leadership d’experts locaux dans des projets de construction, apprendre les langues locales, poser des questions sur les coutumes et les cérémonies, participer aux célébrations, poser des questions sur les expériences des hôtes, apprendre à extraire l’eau des puits , apprendre à traire une vache et simplement en prêtant toute l’attention est portée à la manière dont les visiteurs de Tandana font preuve de respect pour les cultures de leurs hôtes, traditionnellement dévalorisés. Esther Perugachi de Cutambi, en Équateur, qui a appris à un groupe de volontaires de Tandana à fabriquer du pain, des bracelets et des écharpes, a déclaré: “Le jour où nous avons fait du pain, le jour où nous étions ici pour fabriquer des écharpes et des bracelets, je me sentais vraiment bien. Les gens m’ont posé des questions, comme si j’étais quelqu’un d’important. ” C’est une injustice tragique qui donne à Esther l’impression de n’être pas une personne importante et que l’histoire rend encore plus urgente.

Entendre plus:

Le respect des cultures, des connaissances, des techniques et des expériences est précieux, mais finalement, le respect des personnes à qui elles appartiennent est plus important. J’ai appris cette leçon grâce à une erreur que j’ai commise lorsque j’ai travaillé avec les habitants de Kansongho, au Mali. Les dirigeants locaux ont proposé de planter un verger, qui devrait être inclus pour empêcher le bétail de dévorer les jeunes arbres. Ils avaient demandé des fonds pour une clôture en grillage pour empêcher les animaux d’entrer. Voulant valoriser les technologies et les façons de faire traditionnelles, j’ai proposé de construire un mur de pierre pour protéger le jardin, et les dirigeants du village ont accepté. Un groupe de volontaires de Tandana s’est rendu à Kansongho et a travaillé avec les habitants pour construire le mur. Des hommes de la région ont jeté d’énormes pierres du substrat rocheux et les ont mises en place, tandis que des volontaires et des jeunes de la région en ont emporté de plus petites.

Après plusieurs jours de travail, le mur était terminé et les jeunes arbres étaient plantés à l’intérieur. Cela correspond parfaitement à l’esthétique de la ville, en combinant avec les murs que les résidents avaient autour de leurs complexes. Cependant, en un mois, les chèvres avaient escaladé le mur et lors de la saison des pluies suivante, une violente tempête a soufflé sur une section. Après cela, nous avons remplacé le mur par une clôture en fil de fer qui protège le jardin depuis huit ans. Au lieu d’écouter respectueusement le plan des dirigeants locaux, j’ai essayé de suivre mes propre image de ce que ce serait de respecter leurs traditions. Bien entendu, l’important est d’écouter les gens avec respect.

Bien que les hiérarchies mondiales requièrent une attention particulière au respect, Tandana cherche à établir des relations mutuellement respectueuses, cherchant à gagner, au lieu de commander, le respect de ses partenaires. Selon les volontaires, cet effort est réussi. Le volontaire J.P. Nelson a rapporté que Tandana “jouit du respect massif et de la loyauté des gens de sa communauté”. Ashley, une volontaire du Massachusetts, a rappelé: “Tandana va au-delà des actions de service en construisant des relations entre les cultures, permettant aux volontaires et aux membres de la communauté de générer respect et admiration mutuelle.” 141

Responsabilité

Les exigences morales du visage et la réalisation des promesses nous appellent à la responsabilité.142 Levinas explique le visage: “au lieu d’offenser ma liberté, il m’appelle à la responsabilité et la fonde”.143 L’aspect de l’autre “m’appelle la responsabilité et consacre ma liberté en tant que responsabilité et don de soi” 144. Ecouter l’appel de l’autre, c’est “postuler en tant que responsable”. 145 La responsabilité est de répondre au besoin ou à la demande d’une autre personne en position de liberté. Il répond également à la confiance de l’autre et maintient la constance de soi par la parole. Ricoeur explique que l’obligation morale de la promesse est de “répondre à la confiance que les autres placent en ma fidélité”. 146

Il Élabore:

L’auto-constance est pour chaque personne cette façon de conduire afin que les autres puissent compter sur elle. Parce que quelqu’un compte sur moi, je suis responsable de mes actions avant les autres. Le terme “responsabilité” lie les deux sens: “compter sur” et “être responsable de”. Il les rejoint en ajoutant l’idée d’une réponse à la question “Où es-tu?”, Posée par quelqu’un qui a besoin de moi. Cette réponse est la suivante: “Je suis là!”, Une réponse qui est une déclaration de cohérence personnelle.147

La responsabilité implique de répondre à l’appel de l’autre et d’être responsable: être quelqu’un avec qui une autre personne peut compter. En remplissant nos engagements, nous devenons des êtres avec des identités constantes au fil du temps. Ricoeur soutient:

La question devient: “Qui suis-je, si inconstant, que vous pouvez compter sur moi?” Le décalage entre la question qui entoure l’imagination narrative et la réponse du sujet tenu pour responsable de l’attente de l’autre devient la question de la rupture secrète au cœur même de l’engagement.148

La responsabilité nous permet non seulement de satisfaire les besoins des autres, mais aussi d’être véritablement nous-mêmes.

La responsabilité est une autre valeur fondamentale de l’approche de Tandana. Dans un sens fondamental, la pratique de cette valeur consiste à se répondre les uns aux autres et à être prêts à accomplir ce que nous avons convenu de faire. Pour Tandana, la responsabilité signifie également de continuer à collaborer jusqu’à la fin du projet et de faire un suivi pour voir quels sont ses effets et si un soutien supplémentaire est nécessaire.

Parfois, dans le but de renforcer leur indépendance, les ONG ont pour politique de rester très brièvement seules dans un domaine. Cependant, dans leur hâte, ils échouent parfois pour aider les communautés à réellement s’approprier les projets. Comme le disait Moussa Tembiné, “La Fondation Tandana ne se considère pas comme une ONG. Les ONG viennent. S’il s’agit de construire un puits, ils le font et ils s’en vont. Si c’est une banque de grain ou un moulin, ils le donnent et ils partent. Deux ou trois ans plus tard, le projet ne fonctionne plus “149.

Tandana reste en contact avec la communauté, s’assurant que les dirigeants locaux sont équipés pour gérer le projet. En Équateur, Tandana a collaboré avec plusieurs communautés sur d’importants projets de construction, tels qu’un nouveau centre communautaire et un nouveau bâtiment d’école.

Les contraintes budgétaires ne nous permettent pas de traiter un grand projet à la fois, mais nous expliquons que nous pouvons aider en petites phases. Tandana et les communautés sont restées concentrées et ont achevé les projets, étape par étape. Luis Chicaiza, professeur à Cutambi, en Équateur, a déclaré: “Votre philosophie est de mener à bien un projet et non de le laisser incomplet. Je pense que c’est l’avantage qu’ils ont sur les autres organisations. “150 Matías Perugachi, responsable de la pépinière autochtone UCINQUI à Achupallas, en Équateur, a expliqué: “La Fondation Tandana n’est pas comme les autres organisations, publiques ou privées, qui pourrait aider une fois et partir. La Fondation Tandana a effectué un suivi exhaustif à long terme pour que les choses aillent mieux. “151

Entendre plus:

Les partenaires communautaires en relation avec Tandana font également preuve de responsabilité. Fabian Pinsag, président de Muenala, en Équateur, par exemple, a expliqué: “Demander de l’aide, autre chose, et de faire un suivi et de montrer la responsabilité de la communauté. Nous avons planté des arbres avec l’aide de Tandana, et nous avons mis des fils de fer barbelés pour que les animaux ne les endommagent pas.”

Ando Tembiné de Kansongho, Mali, a également souligné l’importance d’avancer lors de la clôture d’un atelier sur la fabrication de cuisines. en disant:
Nous venons de passer 8 jours ensemble sans problèmes et avons appris à créer des outils qui nous permettront non seulement de réduire les enregistrements excessifs sur notre territoire, mais également la charge de travail pour nos femmes.

Dieu merci, tout se termine bien. Cependant, nous devons continuer à travailler pour atteindre notre objectif. Tout le monde ici doit continuer à fabriquer un grand nombre de poêles et à éduquer les villageois sur l’utilisation des poêles.153 Le gagnant de la bourse Soraya Bolaños de La Joya, en Équateur, a écrit: “Je ne vous décevrai pas, je montrerai ma responsabilité et ma grande reconnaissance.”154

Rolando Quilumbango

Rolando Quilumbango de Panecillo, Équateur, a également déclaré:

Ce que j’ai appris cette année et ce qui m’aidera à aller de l’avant, c’est que je devrais saisir l’occasion qui m’est offerte d’étudier, par conséquent, je fais un effort chaque jour parce que je ne veux pas trahir ceux qui me soutiennent….De plus, cela m’aide à être plus responsable dans ma tâche car je ne veux pas perdre l’occasion que me donne la Fondation.155

La responsabilité mutuelle informe les relations que Tandana crée.

124 In The Tandana Foundation, Ten Years of Joining Hands and Changing Lives, YouTube video, September 25, 2017 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=374&v=bNgqTUr_N0s).

125 Arrow 20 on the diagram.
1

26 Oxford Living English Dictionaries, https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/respect, accessed June 16, 2018.

127 Levinas, 198.

128 Mehta, xi.

129 Mehta, 214.

130 Mehta, 68.

131 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

132 Ibid.

133 Ibid.

134 Ibid.

135 Ibid.

136 Ibid.

137 Ibid.

138 The Tandana Foundation “Mission & Values,” accessed June 16, 2018, (tandanafoundation.org/mission_and_values.html).

139 Unpublished interview, April 12, 2016.

140 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

141 Ibid.

142 Arrows 21 and 22 in the diagram.

143 Levinas, 203.

144 Ibid., 208.

145 Ibid., 215.

146 Ricoeur, 124.

147 Ibid., 168, emphases in original.

148 Ibid.

149 Ibid.

150 Ibid.

151 Ibid.

152 Ibid.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s