Unpredictable Outcomes and Self-Reflection: Part 5

The development project as an attempt to bring all societies “forward,” along a supposed continuum, is unjustifiable.  And yet there is much important work to be done that looks very much like, and is even called, “development.”  Without development theory as a guiding framework, why do we do this work?  I have tried to explain the philosophical underpinnings for Tandana’s work, describing how they led to the work we do, but even more importantly, to the way in which we do this work. 

Español

Français

In a series of posts you will find here, I illustrate how the principles on which Tandana is founded play out in concrete application through discussions of my own experiences as well as those of community members and volunteers who have worked with Tandana.  We see how reaching out to others with a personal approach leads, both in theory and in practice, to a world that is, incrementally, more peaceful and more just.  This personal approach could serve not only as impetus for one organization’s work but also to transform the character and effects of other groups seeking right relationship with others.  This is the third in a series of 10 posts that will give insight into both the philosophical reasons and the concrete effects of reaching out to others with a personal approach.  

If you missed Part 1, 2, 3 or 4, read them here.

Unpredictable Outcomes

Action and live encounters have unpredictable outcomes.65 Arendt explains, “Because the actor always moves among and in relation to other acting beings, he is never merely a ‘doer’ but always and at the same time a sufferer”66 and points out, “It is because of this already existing web of human relationships, with its innumerable, conflicting wills and intentions, that action almost never achieves its purpose.”67 She notes that, “Exasperation with the threefold frustration of action— the unpredictability of its outcome, the irreversibility of the process, and the anonymity of its authors— is almost as old as recorded history.”68 Ricoeur expresses this unpredictability as well. As Richard Kearney explains, for Ricoeur, “To exist in history means that ‘to act is to suffer and to suffer is to act.’ . . . Even those we consider the active initiators of history also suffer history to the extent that actions, however calculated, almost invariably produce certain non-intended consequences.”69 Palmer concurs: “Action has a life of its own, related to what we think we are doing, but often full of surprises. Action can take courses and have consequences that are decidedly independent of our own designs for it. . . . The question is whether we are willing to act in the face of these risks, willing to learn and grow from whatever new truths our actions may reveal.”70 A live encounter “penetrates all external appearances and expectations,”71 and might “compel us to change our lives.”72 Unpredictability is certainly a reality in Tandana’s experience. Unexpected events and changes in plan are so common that we instruct all of our volunteers on the importance of flexibility. Ken Gates, who brought several groups of students to Ecuador for Tandana programs, wrote, “Consistently I saw the Tandana team worked together at everything from always having a snack on hand, to coordinating with host families and the day to day…let’s call them unexpected Ecuador surprises/learning opportunities,”73 illustrating how common the surprises are.

Self-Reflection

Live encounters and experiences of difference lead to self-reflection.74 Palmer explains that, “we learn that the self is not a scrap of turf to be defended but a capacity to be enlarged.”75 In action, he notes, “we risk exposing ourselves—selves at once strong and fragile, known and unknown—to the scrutiny of the world and, sometimes less mercifully, to the scrutiny of ourselves.”76 The benefit of taking this risk is that, “by risking we may learn more about ourselves and our world, and the bigger the risk, the greater the learning.”77 Experiencing difference can also lead to dislocation, which, for Palmer, is a contemplative experience that reveals truths previously unknown to us; “This happens when we are forced by circumstance to occupy a very different standpoint from our normal one, our angle of vision suddenly changes to reveal a strange and threatening landscape.”78 When we, “admit pluralism, we are forced to admit that ours is not the only standpoint, the only experience, the only way, and the truths we have built our lives on begin to feel fragile.”79 Thus we must reflect on our own views.

Integrating into Malian social life caused me to reflect a great deal on myself. I had traveled there in an effort to reach out to the unfamiliar and learn about a culture that was new to me. I had found a local contact through a friend of a friend and asked him if he had any ideas for volunteer work I could do and a local family I could live with. He had invited me to live with his family, and I had gone to do that without having any idea what I would do there. Without an established role or activity, I was forced to reflect constantly on my reasons for traveling to Mali in the first place and whether or not I could handle the challenges and whether or not I could contribute in any way to the community I was getting to know. The daily requests for money and gifts that I encountered made me very uncomfortable and led me to question the reasons for my discomfort and the assumptions that I held about economic inequality and polite behavior. Similarly, the response to gifts, which was to show them to others as a way of honoring the giver made me quite uncomfortable as well, and again caused me to question the reasons for my discomfort. I was also surprised to experience a different set of expectations regarding the expression of emotions. Communal events, such as a death or the arrival of good news for a village led to intense public displays of shared emotions, but personal emotions were kept very private and never revealed in public settings. Trying to learn not to display my own personal feelings in inappropriate ways, I reflected on my relationship with my emotions and the different purposes their expression serves.

Self-reflection emerging from live encounters with difference is also regularly reported by Tandana volunteers. “The challenges you will face teach you invaluable lessons not only about another culture but about yourself,” wrote Mariah, a student volunteer.80 Jim Hoyne, a doctor who volunteered many times with Tandana, wrote, “You will go home absolutely overwhelmed by what you saw, who you met, what you’ve learned, and how your heart has expanded. You will be inspired to exceed your own expectations of yourself.”81 Emily Kuipers, another volunteer, reported, “It has caused me to rethink parts of my life–I’m now seriously considering going into medicine!”82 Molly Carroll similarly explained, “Specific moments and patients in the mobile clinic still stick with me and the experience was quite transformative in my life path. . . . Tandana has been influential in guiding my life goals.”83 Live encounters with that which is different lead to reflection on our own perspectives, plans, assumptions, and expectations. Finding ourselves dislocated or confronted with inassimilable difference causes us to learn more about ourselves.

Jim Hoyne

Emily Esfahani Smith argues that knowing ourselves better, in turn, leads to greater opportunities for meaningful action.84 Smith argues that, “Researchers at Texas A & M University have examined the tight relationship between identity and purpose, and they’ve found that knowing oneself is one of the most important predictors of meaning in life,” and that, “Being reminded of your authentic self, even subconsciously, makes life feel more meaningful.”85 Self-knowledge is important because, “Each of us has different strengths, talents, insights, and experiences that shape who we are. And so each of us will have a different purpose, one that fits with who we are and what we value — one that fits our identity.”86 As we know ourselves better, through experiences of that which is different, we are more likely to be able to act in meaningful ways. Reflecting on my discomfort with being asked for money helped me to differentiate between situations when I felt it was appropriate to give money and situations when I felt it was not appropriate to do so. With better discernment, I was able to act more freely by giving when I felt called to give.

64 Ibid.

65 Arrows 6 and 7 on the diagram.

66 Arendt, 190.

67 Ibid., 184.

68 Ibid., 220.

69 Kearney, Richard, On Paul Ricoeur: The Owl of Minerva (London: Routledge, 2017), 61.

70 Palmer, The Active Life, 22.

71 Ibid., 71

72 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

73 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

74 Arrows 8 and 9 on the diagram.

75 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

76 Palmer, The Active Life, 22.

77 Ibid., 23.

78 Ibid., 27.

79 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 38.

80 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

81 Ibid.

82 Ibid.

83 Ibid.

84 Arrow 10 on the diagram.

Español

Resultados Impredicibles y Autoreflexión: Parte 5

El proyecto de desarrollo como un intento de llevar a todas las sociedades “hacia adelante” a lo largo de un supuesto continuo, es injustificable. Y sin embargo, hay mucho trabajo importante por hacer que se parece mucho, e incluso se llama, “desarrollo”. Sin la teoría del desarrollo como marco guía, ¿por qué hacemos este trabajo? He tratado de explicar los fundamentos filosóficos del trabajo de Tandana, describiendo cómo conducen al trabajo que hacemos, pero más importante aún, a la forma en que hacemos este trabajo.

En una serie de publicaciones que encontrará aquí, ilustre cómo los principios en los que se basa Tandana se llevan a cabo en una aplicación concreta a través de discusiones sobre mis propias experiencias y las de los miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios que han trabajado con Tandana. Vemos cómo llegar a otros con un enfoque personal conduce, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica, a un mundo que es, de manera incremental, más pacífico y más justo. Este enfoque personal podría servir no solo como un impulso para el trabajo de una organización, sino también para transformar el carácter y los efectos de otros grupos que buscan una relación correcta con los demás. Este es el segundo de una serie de 10 publicaciones que dará una idea de las razones filosóficas y los efectos concretos de acercarse a los demás con un enfoque personal.

Si te perdiste la Parte 1, 2, 3 y 4, léelas aquí.

Resultados Impredicibles

La acción y los encuentros vivos tienen resultados impredicibles.65 Arendt explica, “Porque el actor siempre mueve entre y en relación con otros seres actors, él nunca es simplemente un ‘hacedor’ sino siempre y al mismo tiempo un enfermo”66 y nota que “Es por esta red de relaciones humanos, con sus voluntades y intenciones innumerables y contradictorios, que la acción casi nunca logra su propósito.”67 Ella nota que “la exasperación con la frustración triplicada de acción – la imprevisibilidad de los resultados, la irrrevocabilidad del proceso, y el anonimato de sus autores- es casi tan antigua que la historia escrita.”68Ricoeur también expresa esta imprevisibilidad. Como explica Richard Kearney, para Ricoeur, “Exisitir en la historia significa que ‘actuar es sufrir y sufrir es actuar’ . . . Incluso ellos que consideramos los iniciadores activos de la historia también sufren historia hasta el punto que las acciones, sin importar como lo calculen, casi invariablemente producen algunas consecuencias sin querer.” 69 Palmer está de acuerdo: “La acción tiene una vida propia, relacionada con lo que pensamos que estamos haciendo, pero frecuentemente llena de sorpresas”.

La acción puede tomar cursos y tener consecuencias que están indudablemente independientes que nuestros propios diseños . . . la cuestión es si estamos dispuestosa actuar en la cara de estos riesgos, dispuestos a aprender y crecer de cualquiera de las verdades nuevas que nuetras acciones pueden revelar.70 Un encuentro vivo “penetra todoas las apariciones externas y expectaciones,”71 y puede compelernos a cambiar las vidas.” 72 La imprevisibilidad es, con certeza, una realidad en la experiencia de Tandana. Los eventos inesperados y camibos de planes están tan comunes que dames instruciones a los voluntaries de la importancia de la flexibilidad. Ken Gates, quien llevó varios grupos de alumnos a Ecuador para los programas de Tandana, escribió: “Con regularidad, veía que el equipo de Tandana trabajaba juntos en todo, de siempre tener una comida entre manos, hasta coordinar con las familias anfitrionas y con las, digamos, sorpresas inesperadas y oportunidades de aprender de Ecuador,”73 para ilustrar las sorpresas comunes.

Autoreflexión

Los encuentros vivos y experiencias de diferencia nos llevan a la autoreflexión.74 Palmer explica que “nosotros aprendemos que el mismo no es un pedacito de césped para defender, sino una capacidad para agrandar.”75 En acción Palmer nota, “arriesgamos exponernos- los mismos de una vez Fuertes y fragiles, conocids y desconocidos – al escrutinio de nosotros mismos.”76 El beneficio de tomar este riesgo es que “por arriesgar, nosotros podemps aprender mas sobre nosotros mismos y nuestro mundo, y a mas grande el riesgo, a mas grande el aprendizaje.”77 Al experimentar la differencia también puede llevar a la dislocación, lo cual par Palmer es una experiencia contemplative que revela las verdades que antes eran desconocidas. “Esto pasa cuando la circumstancia nos fuerza a ocupar un punto de vista muy diferente de lo normal. Nuestro ángulo de vision cambia de repente para revelar un paisaje extraño y amenazante.”78 Cuando nostotros “admitimos el pluralism, estamos forzados a confesar que nuestro no es el único punto de vista, la única experiencia, la única manera, y las verdades que en cuales hemos construido las vidas empiezan a estar frágiles”. Por lo tanto, debemos reflexionar sobre nuestros propios puntos de vista.

Integrar con la vida social de Mali me hizo reflexionar mucho sobre mi mismo. Había viajado allí en un intento a experimentar el desconocimiento y aprender de una cultura nueva. Encontré un contacto local por un amigo y le pregunté y tenia algunas ideas para trabajo de voluntario que podía hacer, o de una familia con quien quedarme. Me invitó a convivir con su familia, y fui sin ninguna idea que lo que estuviera haciendo. Sin un papel establecido ni una actividad, tuve que reflexionar constantamente sore mis razones para ir a Mali en el primer lugar, y si podia manejar losretos o contribuir de alguna manera a la comunidad que estaba conociendo. Los pedidos diarios para dinero y regalos que encontraba me ponía muy incómodo y me hizo preguntarme sobre las razones de mi incomodidad y sobre las suposiciones que tuve sobre la desigualdad económica y el comportamiento educado. Igualmente, la respuesta a los regalos, cual era enseñarles a otras personas para honorar el donante me ponía incómodo también, y otroz vez me hizo preguntarme sobre las razones de mi incomodidad. También, me sorprendió la experiencia de las expectativas diferentes con respecto a la expression de emociones. Eventos communales, como una muerte o la llegada de buenas noticias para un pueblo llevó una exposición público y intense de emociones compartiddas, pero las emociones personales se quedaban muy privadas y nunca reveladas en público. Intentar aprender no demostrar mis sentimientos en una manera inapropriada, reflexioné en mi relación con mis emociones y con los propositos diferente para que sirven la expresiones.

La autoreflexión que viene de los encuentros vivos con la diferencia también esta declarado regularmente por los voluntaries de Tandana. “Los retos que enfrentas te enseñaran lecciones inestimables, no solo sobre otra cultura, sino sobre tu mismo”, escribió Mariah, una voluntaria alumna.80 Jim Hoyne, un medico quien era voluntario muchas veces con Tandana, escribió, “Volverás a tu casa completamente abrumado de lo que viste, de quien conociste, de que aprendiste, y como ha expadido tu corazón. Estarás inspirado a exceder de tus expectativas de tu mismo.”81 Emily Kuipers, otra voluntaria, escribió, “Me ha causado a reconsideraar algunas partes de mi vida. Ahora, estoy considerando entrar al campo de medicina!”82 Molly Carroll explica, “Momentos especificos y los pacientes en la clínica quedan conmigo y la experienca fue muy transformative en el camino de mi vida . . . Tandana ha sido muy influyente en guíarme en las metas de mi vida.”83 Los encuentros vivos con cual es diferente lleva a la reflexión de nuestras perspectivas propias, planes, susposiciones, y expectativas. Encontrarnos desplazados o confrontados con la diferencia nos hace aprender mas sobre nosotros mismos.

Jim Hoyne

Emily Esfahani Smith explica que conocernos major nos lleva a oportunidades mejores para acción significative.84 Smith dice que “los investigadores a la Universidad Texas A & M han examinado la relación fuerte entre la identidad y el propósito, y han encontrado que conocer a uno mismo es uno de los mejores indicadores del significado en la vida”, y que “Estar recordado de tu mismo auténtico , incluso subconscientemente, nos da la vida mas sentido.”85 Autoconocimiento es importante porque “cada uno de nosotros tiene fuerzas, talentos, percepciones, y experiencias que forman quienes somos. Así que cada uno tendremos propósitos diferentes, uno que queda bien con quien somos y con que valoramos – uno que queda bien con nuestra identidad”.86 Como nos conocemos major, por experiences que son diferentes, somos mas probables poder actuar en maneras significativas. Reflexionar de mi incomodidad de las pedidas de dinero me ayudó distinguir entre las situaciones cuando lo sentí apropriada dar dinero y las situaciones cuando lo sentí inapropridada. Con el discernamiento major, pude actuar mas liberalmente por dar cuando me llamó.

64 Ibid.

65 Flechas 6 and 7 en el diagrama.

66 Arendt, 190.

67 Ibid., 184.

68 Ibid., 220.

69 Kearney, Richard, On Paul Ricoeur: The Owl of Minerva (London: Routledge, 2017), 61.

70 Palmer, The Active Life, 22.

71 Ibid., 71

72 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

73 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

74 Arrows 8 and 9 on the diagram.

75 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

76 Palmer, The Active Life, 22.

77 Ibid., 23.

78 Ibid., 27.

79 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 38.

80 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

81 Ibid.

82 Ibid.

83 Ibid.

84 Arrow 10 on the diagram.

Français

Résultats imprévisibles et Réflexion individuelle: Partie 4

Le projet de développement comme tentative de «faire avancer» toutes les sociétés dans un continuum supposé est injustifiable. Et pourtant, il y a beaucoup de travail important à faire qui ressemble beaucoup au “développement”. Sans théorie du développement comme cadre directeur, pourquoi faisons-nous ce travail? J’ai essayé d’expliquer les fondements philosophiques du travail de Tandana, en décrivant comment ils conduisaient au travail que nous faisons, mais surtout, à la façon dont nous faisons ce travail.

Dans une série d’articles que vous trouverez ici, j’illustrerai comment les principes sur lesquels Tandana est fondée se concrétisent par des discussions sur mes propres expériences ainsi que sur celles de membres de la communauté et de bénévoles qui ont travaillé avec Tandana. Nous voyons comment le fait de s’approcher aux autres avec une approche personnelle conduit, à la fois en théorie et en pratique, à un monde de plus en plus pacifique et plus juste. Cette approche personnelle pourrait non seulement servir d’élan au travail d’une organisation, mais aussi transformer le caractère et les effets d’autres groupes à la recherche de bonnes relations avec les autres. Il s’agit de la seconde d’une série de 10 publications qui donneront un aperçu à la fois des raisons philosophiques et des effets concrets de la prise de contact avec une approche personnelle.

Si vous avez manqué la Partie 1, 2, 3 et 4, lisez-la ici.

Résultats imprévisibles

Les actions et les rencontres directes suscitent des résultats imprévisibles.65 Selon Ardendt, « vu la relation et l’interaction constantes de l’acteur avec les autres, il ne peut être un simple « protagoniste » sans être simultanément un figurant ».66 Elle souligne en outre qu’en raison de ce réseau préexistant de relations humaines, où figurent d’innombrables volontés et intentions conflictuelles, il est presque toujours impossible de finaliser une action.67 Arendt affirme que l’exaspération issue des trois caractéristiques défavorables de l’action (l’imprévisibilité de ses résultats, l’irréversibilité des processus et l’anonymat de ses auteurs) s’observe presque dans toute l’histoire de l’humanité.68 Ricoeur mentionne également cette notion d’imprévisibilité.

Dans sa bibliographie sur Ricoeur, Richard Kearney explique : « l’existence humaine se résume “à agir pour subir et à subir pour agir”. Même ceux que l’on considère comme les plus grands acteurs de l’histoire se placent également en spectateurs, dans la mesure où les actions, malgré leur prudence, génèrent presque invariablement certaines conséquences inattendues. »69 Palmer ajoute : « L’action, bien que rattachée à ce que notre représentation de nos actes, est incontrôlable et souvent pleine de surprises. Son cheminement et ses conséquences sont décidément indépendants de notre volonté. La question est de savoir si nous sommes prêts à agir malgré ces risques, prêts à apprendre et à s’enrichir des nouvelles expériences que nos actions peuvent susciter. »70 Une rencontre directe « transcende les apparences externes et les attentes »,71 et peut « nous inspirer à changer nos vies ».72 L’imprévisibilité est un fait avéré dans l’expérience de Tandana. Vu la répétitivité des événements imprévus et les modifications de plan, nous recommandons à nos bénévoles l’importance de la flexibilité. Pour illustrer le critère courant des imprévus, Ken Gates, un des responsables ayant dirigé plusieurs groupes de jeunes en Équateur pour les programmes de Tandana a affirmé avoir constaté la collaboration continue de l’équipe de l’organisation dans toutes les situations, que ce soit pour les collations, la coordination avec les familles d’accueil et les divers imprévus et occasions d’apprentissage quotidiens rencontrés en Équateur.73

Réflexion individuelle

Les rencontres directes et l’expérience de la diversité suscitent la réflexion individuelle.74 Palmer explique que «nous apprenons à ne pas considérer l’individualité comme un terrain à défendre, mais plutôt une capacité à élargir »75 Il ajoute que dans l’action, « nous risquons à exposer notre personnalité (une personnalité à la fois forte, inconnue et connue) au regard du monde, et parfois avec moins de clémence au nôtre » .76 Prendre ce risque nous donne comme avantage la possibilité d’en apprendre davantage sur nous-même et le monde. Plus nous nous soumettons à ce risque, plus nous en apprenons davantage.

L’expérience de la diversité peut également susciter un certain déracinement, qui selon Palmer représente une expérience contemplative permettant de révéler des vérités qui auparavant nous étaient inconnues. «  Cela se présente lorsque les circonstances nous forcent à adopter un point de vue différent de ce à quoi nous sommes habitués, de sorte que notre perspective change subitement pour révéler un monde étrange et menaçant. »78 Lorsque nous admettons le pluralisme, nous sommes forcés à admettre qu’il existe des perspectives autres que la nôtre.79 Nous devons ainsi faire un examen introspectif.

Intégrer la vie sociale malienne m’a poussé à beaucoup réfléchir sur moi-même. J’y suis allé afin de pouvoir expérimenter l’inconnu et de découvrir une nouvelle culture. J’ai demandé à un contact local que j’ai rencontré par le biais d’une connaissance d’un ami s’il connaissait une opportunité de travail bénévole et une famille d’accueil chez laquelle je pourrai séjourner. Il m’a invité à séjourner au sein de sa famille et je me suis lancé sans avoir aucune idée de ce qui m’y attendait. Étant sans activité ni fonction définie, j’ai été poussé à constamment réfléchir aux raisons pour lesquelles je suis initialement parti au Mali, si j’avais la capacité d’affronter les défis et si je pouvais contribuer d’une quelconque manière à la communauté que je commençais à découvrir. Les requêtes quotidiennes que j’ai reçues pour de l’argent et des cadeaux ont été pour moi une source de gêne démesurée et m’ont poussé à revoir les raisons de mon inconfort et mes présomptions sur l’inégalité économique et la bienséance. Il en était de même quant à leur réaction aux cadeaux offerts, ils les exhibaient aux autres en signe d’honneur au donneur. J’ai été également surpris de découvrir une norme différente sur l’extériorisation des sentiments. Les événements communaux, comme la mort ou une occasion festive au village, ont suscité des effusions publiques et communes intenses, tandis que les émotions personnelles se limitaient jalousement au cercle privé et n’étaient jamais exprimées en public. Mon effort pour apprendre à ne pas afficher mes émotions personnelles de manière inappropriée m’a poussé à réfléchir sur mes rapports émotionnels et les diverses finalités de leur expression.

Les volontaires de Tandana signalent aussi régulièrement une réflexion personnelle issue de l’expérience directe de la diversité. « Les défis que vous allez rencontrer seront pour vous une source d’apprentissage inestimable, non seulement sur une autre culture, mais aussi sur vous-même », a affirmé Mariah, une étudiante bénévole.80 Jim Hoyne, un médecin et fervent bénévole de Tandana, a affirmé : « à votre départ, vous seriez complètement ébahi par votre expérience, vos rencontres, ce que vous y aurez appris et par l’expansion de votre cœur. Vous serez incité à surpasser vos attentes sur vous-même. »81 Emily Kuipers, une autre bénévole, a signalé : « cela m’a poussé à reconsidérer certains aspects de ma vie. J’envisage maintenant me consacrer sérieusement à la médecine ! »82 Molly Carroll a également affirmé qu’elle garde toujours en mémoire certains événements et personnes de la clinique mobile et que cette expérience a vraiment transformé son parcours personnel. . . . Tandana a été selon elle, une pièce maîtresse dans la découverte de ses objectifs personnels.83 L’expérience directe de la diversité suscite une réflexion sur nos perspectives, nos plans, nos présomptions et nos attentes. Le déracinement ou une confrontation à une différence inouïe nous pousse à en apprendre davantage sur nous-même.

Jim Hoyne

Emily Esfahani Smith soutient qu’une meilleure connaissance de soi suscite à son tour de meilleures opportunités d’action significative.84 «  Des chercheurs de l’Université du Texas A & M ont examiné la relation étroite entre l’identité et l’objectif. Ils ont conclu que la connaissance de soi figure parmi les principaux facteurs pour trouver un sens à la vie. La réminiscence de votre personnalité authentique ajoute un sens à votre vie », souligne-t-elle.85 La connaissance de soi est importante, car « chacun de nous est doté de forces, de talents, de visions et d’expériences différents qui font de nous ce que nous sommes. Chacun aura donc un objectif différent correspondant à notre personnalité et nos valeurs, voire à notre identité ».86 À mesure que nous nous découvrons un peu plus par l’expérience de ce qui est différent, nous pourrons certainement agir de manière plus significative. Réfléchir sur l’inconfort que j’ai éprouvé lorsque l’on m’a demandé de l’argent m’a permis de différencier les situations dans lesquelles selon moi il était approprié de donner de l’argent de celles où le faire aurait été inapproprié. Grâce à un meilleur discernement, j’ai pu agir avec plus de liberté dans les dons que j’avais à faire.

64 Ibid.

65 Flèches 6 et 7 sur le schéma.

66 Arendt, 190.

67 Ibid., 184.

68 Ibid., 220.

69 Kearney, Richard, On Paul Ricoeur:

The Owl of Minerva (London:Routledge, 2017), 61.

70 Palmer, The Active Life, 22.

71 Ibid., 71

72 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

73 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

74 Flèches 8 et 9 du schéma.

75 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 39.

76 Palmer, The Active Life, 22.

77 Ibid., 23.

78 Ibid., 27.

79 Palmer, The Courage to Teach, 38.

80 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

81 Ibid.

82 Ibid.

83 Ibid.

84 Flèche 10 sur le schéma.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s