Experiencing gratitude and Greater awareness of what it is to be human: Part 7

The development project as an attempt to bring all societies “forward,” along a supposed continuum, is unjustifiable.  And yet there is much important work to be done that looks very much like, and is even called, “development.”  Without development theory as a guiding framework, why do we do this work?  I have tried to explain the philosophical underpinnings for Tandana’s work, describing how they led to the work we do, but even more importantly, to the way in which we do this work. 

Español

Français

In a series of posts you will find here, I illustrate how the principles on which Tandana is founded play out in concrete application through discussions of my own experiences as well as those of community members and volunteers who have worked with Tandana.  We see how reaching out to others with a personal approach leads, both in theory and in practice, to a world that is, incrementally, more peaceful and more just.  This personal approach could serve not only as impetus for one organization’s work but also to transform the character and effects of other groups seeking right relationship with others.  This is the sixth in a series of 10 posts that will give insight into both the philosophical reasons and the concrete effects of reaching out to others with a personal approach.  

If you missed Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6, read them here.

Experiencing Gratitude

Both sharing and forgiveness generate experiences of gratitude.105 When one person gives kindly to another, the natural response of the recipient is gratitude. When mutual sharing takes place, the effect is often mutual gratitude. This mutual gratitude is often shared by community members and Tandana volunteers. During the first Tandana volunteer program in Kansongho, Mali, the volunteers expressed amazement at the generosity of the villagers, who had few material possessions relative to the volunteers, but gave freely of their peanuts, cloth, jewelry, and other gifts, as well as sharing their time, daily activities, and culture with the visitors. Pebelou Tembiné, one of the elders of Kansongho, meanwhile, expressed wonder at the fact that this group of Americans who had no necessity forcing them to leave their country, had traveled so far to reach Kansongho, and then, once they were there, had agreed to carry rocks on their heads to assist with the building project.

Carrying Rocks

Both visitors and hosts were overcome with gratitude for the openness, generosity, and good will of the other. Not long ago I received a visit from Alberto Panamá, a leader of the community of Motilón Chupa, Ecuador, which had recently hosted a group of Tandana volunteers. “We are so happy,” he said, referring to the community’s partnership with Tandana, Tandana’s support for their irrigation tank, and the visit of the student volunteers.“We are happier,” I replied, remembering the
great generosity of the women who had cooked delicious meals for the visiting students each day; the commitment of Alberto, who had worked late each evening in order to ensure the tank would be finished by the time the students departed; and the joy shared by Angela, who kicked off the dancing during the farewell ceremony. We each expressed appreciation for what the other had shared and concern that the other would get tired of us. We each tried to allay the other’s concern, reiterating our thankfulness. Sharing allows for deep experiences of mutual gratitude. Forgiveness also leads to experiences of gratitude. As Kearney explains, “forgiveness is a ‘marvel’” with “a certain gratuitousness.”106 Because it is not owed or expected, it gives rise to gratitude. I was, quite frankly, amazed by Modibo’s response to my apology and filled with appreciation.

Alberto Panamá

Greater Awareness of What It is to be Human

Both experiences of difference and self-reflection lead to greater understanding of the human condition.107 The dangers of extrapolating a universal “human nature” from the experience of just one cultural milieu are well documented and the category of universal humanity has been deconstructed based on the fallacy of taking one particular version as universal. Yet, there are similarities as well as differences among us, and the category of the human can be quite useful, not only politically but also ethically. If, instead of beginning with an a priori idea of what is human and then using it to judge and exclude those who do not fit the image, we start with the assumption that all people are human and then slowly build an idea of humanness a posteriori, based on experience with different human beings, we can start to gain an understanding of what it is to be human. If we want to understand humanness, in fact, we must consider a variety of examples and what their differences and similarities reveal. Even Judith Butler, who in her wariness of the exclusionary history of notions of the human condition disavows that there is such a shared condition,108 admits that probing difference is how we come to understand what is human. She writes, for example, “[t]o come up against what functions, for some, as a limit case for the human is a challenge to rethink the human,” and, “human rights law has yet to understand the full meaning of the human. It is, we might say, an ongoing task of human rights to reconceive the human when it finds that its putative universality does not have universal reach.”109

An effort to seek understanding of a shared humanity across difference does not depend on a domestication of that difference. Mehta contrasts the vision of difference contained within a familiar structure, which he calls “the cosmopolitanism of reason,” with what he calls the “cosmopolitanism of sentiments.”110 He cites Edmund Burke as an exemplar of the latter outlook, noting that Burke’s “thought is pitched at a level that takes seriously the sentiments, feelings, and attachments through which peoples are, and aspire to be, ‘at home.’”111 Such a view involves openness to the unfamiliar, “undergirded by humility and a concern with the sentiments that give meaning to people’s lives,” and leads to a risky conversation in which understanding across boundaries of difference may or may not be achieved. Mehta suggests that this perspective is cosmopolitan in that it “holds out the possibility, even the hope, that through the conversation, which has as its purpose the understanding of the sentiments that give meaning to people’s lives, wider bonds of sympathy can be forged.”112 This perspective involves thinking “in terms of concepts through which the coherence of other peoples’ lives can, in principle, become evident as a concrete and experienced reality,”113 and is based on “an ontology in which life, at least human life, occurs within the fold of an arch of certain characteristic modes of human experience that involve fear, pain, interiority, desire, and a sense of continuity linking past and future.”114 A perspective like the “cosmopolitanism of sentiments” allows us to seek understanding across difference, trusting that there are some things we share as human beings and yet refusing to make detailed assumptions about what these are.

Self-reflection also provides an avenue to greater understanding of the human condition. Our selves are the human beings with whom we are most intimately familiar, and introspection allows us to see aspects of human experience that we cannot discern from others. Learning more about ourselves through experiences of dislocation helps us better understand what is human in us. Comparing what we find in ourselves with what we see in others can help us discover hidden similarities and also broaden our concepts of the human. Roy Rappaport delineates three levels of meaning:

Whereas low-order meaning is shaped by distinction and middle-order meaning is carried by the discovery or revelation of similarities (often hidden) among apparently disparate things, what I shall call high-order meaning (in previous publications “highest-order meaning”) is grounded in identity or unity, the radical identification or unification of self with other.115

High-order meaning

For Rappaport, “Whereas low-order meaning’s home is taxonomy and middle-order meaning’s vehicle is metaphor, participation is the way to high-order meaning.”116 Awareness of the human experience at all three of these levels of meaning is possible through experiences of difference accompanied by self-reflection. When we discover differences in our languages, food, dress, and lifestyles, we learn through low-order meaning that there are many ways of being human. As we realize that different cultural expressions often spring from the same underlying values, we learn through middle-order meaning about unexpected human similarities. When we participate in communal expressions of joy or sorrow, we feel through high-order meaning our unity as human beings. The unity of high-order meaning may seem to conflict with the importance, explained earlier, of maintaining plurality. However, these moments of radical identification are outside of ordinary time. Although action is not possible in the state of unity, these experiences do teach us important lessons about what it is to be human. As we go up through these levels, awareness becomes a more accurate description of what we gain than understanding. There is a sense in which the human cannot be described or fully known. Butler finds the human at the limits of language:

For if I am confounded by you, then you are already of me, and I am nowhere without you. I cannot muster the “we” except by finding the way in which I am tied to “you,” by trying to translate but finding that my own language must break up and yield if I am to know you. You are what I gain through this disorientation and loss. This is how the human comes into being, again and again, as that which we have yet to know.117

Even visual representation of the human must fail, but in doing so makes us aware of that which it cannot contain. Butler argues, “the human is not represented by the face. Rather, the human is indirectly affirmed in that very disjunction that makes representation impossible, and this disjunction is conveyed in the impossible representation.”118

Failure of Representation

The intercultural experiences that Tandana facilitates make possible greater awareness of what it is to be human. When I took a group of volunteers to Kori- Maoundé, Mali, several local leaders led us on a tour of the village. One stop was the grande famille home, the building that represented the founders and ancestors of the village.

The chief, Amadou Napo, explained that there was a stone inside the house called the worry stone. If a man had too many worries, he could sit on that stone, cover his face with his hands, and confess his troubles honestly to the ancestors. Through this act he would find relief. The volunteers each wanted to take a turn sitting on the stone, and I asked if that would be okay. Amadou agreed, and we all went outside except for Susan who would sit on the stone first. As we gathered outside the doorway, Amadou and his companion Boureima started laughing out loud. They simply could not believe that Americans would have worries too. Americans had plenty of money, and they assumed that lack of money was the source of worries. This moment illuminated something for both hosts and visitors, revealing to the Malians that money was not the only reason for worry and removing any illusions the Americans might have had about a simpler, carefree village life. It suggested to all of us that perhaps part of being human is to worry.

The grande famille house

Both hosts and visitors who meet through Tandana express awareness of humanity through the three levels of meaning. Volunteer Pat Pahl wrote, “I have a new perception on humanity after being in Kansongho!”119 Cristina Fuerez of Panecillo, Ecuador writes that experiences with North Americans have taught her that many people, “are interested in learning about the many cultures that exist in the world, since this differentiates us and identifies us,”120 highlighting low order meaning. J.P. Nelson from California wrote, “For people looking to greatly expand their understanding of the common bonds of humanity while learning about the Otavaleño people and their traditions and current conditions, I highly recommend Tandana,”121 alluding to both low and middle order meaning. After describing what she experienced in Kansongho, Mali, volunteer Julie Lundquist alluded to the first two levels of meaning, writing, “I can only hope that both the differences and similarities of our cultures enhanced each other. We are indeed one people sharing far more than I ever imagined. . . . Through my intention to learn more about the amazing people in Kansongho, I learned much about myself, about living fully and joyfully, and how thankful I am to be alive!”122 Fabian Pinsag, President of Muenala, Ecuador, said, “We understand each other. We communicate, and I think that is a great achievement for human beings, to know that even though we are from different countries, we are one,”123 hinting at both middle and high order meaning. Rappaport’s high order meaning is perhaps best exemplified in Tandana experience through the welcome events that Malian hosts offered to visiting volunteers. Volunteer Carol Peddie described the experience, tearing up as she recalled its power, “When we drove up in a caravan of 4×4 vehicles, and the whole community was there with song and drums and open arms to meet us and greet us, it was overwhelming. It was emotional, it really was. . . . It was such a welcoming experience. I didn’t expect that, and obviously it’s stayed with me.”124 Moving in rhythm with a large group of people to drum beats, songs, and rifle shots led to an ineffable feeling of unity.

Unity

105 Arrows 16 and 17 on the diagram.

106 Kearney, 96-97.

107 Arrows 18 and 19 on the diagram.

108 Butler, Judith. Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence (London: Verso, 2004), 20.

109 Ibid., 90-91.

110 Mehta, 20-21.

111 Ibid., 21.

112 Ibid., 22.

113 Ibid., 214.

114 Ibid., 34.

115 Rappaport, Roy A., Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), Kindle Locations 1205-1207.

116 Ibid., Kindle Locations 1213-1214.

117 Butler, 49

118 Ibid., 144, emphasis in original.

119 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

120 Ibid.

121 Ibid.

122 Ibid.

123 Ibid.

Español

Experimentando la gratitud y Mayor conciencia de lo que es ser humano: Parte 7

El proyecto de desarrollo como un intento de llevar a todas las sociedades “hacia adelante” a lo largo de un supuesto continuo, es injustificable. Y sin embargo, hay mucho trabajo importante por hacer que se parece mucho, e incluso se llama, “desarrollo”. Sin la teoría del desarrollo como marco guía, ¿por qué hacemos este trabajo? He tratado de explicar los fundamentos filosóficos del trabajo de Tandana, describiendo cómo conducen al trabajo que hacemos, pero más importante aún, a la forma en que hacemos este trabajo.

En una serie de publicaciones que encontrará aquí, ilustre cómo los principios en los que se basa Tandana se llevan a cabo en una aplicación concreta a través de discusiones sobre mis propias experiencias y las de los miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios que han trabajado con Tandana. Vemos cómo llegar a otros con un enfoque personal conduce, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica, a un mundo que es, de manera incremental, más pacífico y más justo. Este enfoque personal podría servir no solo como un impulso para el trabajo de una organización, sino también para transformar el carácter y los efectos de otros grupos que buscan una relación correcta con los demás. Este es el sexto de una serie de 10 publicaciones que dará una idea de las razones filosóficas y los efectos concretos de acercarse a los demás con un enfoque personal.

Si te perdiste la Parte 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 y 6, léelas aquí.

Experimentando la gratitud

Tanto el compartir como el perdón generan experiencias de gratitud.105 Cuando una persona se muestra amable con otra, la respuesta natural del receptor es la gratitud. Cuando se produce el intercambio mutuo, el efecto es a menudo una gratitud mutua. Esta gratitud mutua a menudo es compartida por miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios de Tandana. Durante el primer programa de voluntarios de Tandana en Kansongho, Mali, los voluntarios expresaron su asombro por la generosidad de los aldeanos, quienes tenían pocas posesiones materiales en relación con los voluntarios, pero dieron libremente sus cacahuetes, ropa, joyas y otros regalos, así como compartir su tiempo, actividades diarias y cultura con los visitantes. Pebelou Tembiné, uno de los ancianos de Kansongho, por su parte, expresó asombro por el hecho de que este grupo de estadounidenses que no tenían la necesidad de abandonar su país, habían viajado tanto para llegar a Kansongho, y luego, una vez que estaban allí, acordaron llevar rocas sobre sus cabezas para ayudar con el proyecto de construcción.

Llevando rocas

Tanto los visitantes como los anfitriones fueron superados con gratitud por la franqueza, generosidad y buena voluntad del otro. No hace mucho recibí la visita de Alberto Panamá, líder de la comunidad de Motilón Chupa, Ecuador, que recientemente había recibido a un grupo de voluntarios de Tandana. “Estamos muy felices”, dijo, refiriéndose a la asociación de la comunidad con Tandana, el apoyo de Tandana con su tanque de riego y la visita de los estudiantes voluntarios. “Estamos felices”, respondí, recordando gran generosidad de las mujeres que cocinaron comidas deliciosas para los estudiantes visitantes todos los días; el compromiso de Alberto, quien había trabajado tarde cada noche para asegurarse de que el tanque estuviera terminado para cuando los estudiantes se fueran; y la alegría compartida por Angela, quien dio inicio al baile durante la ceremonia de despedida. Cada uno de nosotros expresó su aprecio por lo que el otro había compartido y la preocupación de que el otro se cansaría de nosotros. Todos intentamos disipar la preocupación del otro, reiterando nuestro agradecimiento. Compartir permite profundas experiencias de gratitud mutua. El perdón también conduce a experiencias de gratitud. Como explica Kearney, “el perdón es una “maravilla” con “una cierta gratuidad”.106 Porque no se debe ni se espera, da lugar a la gratitud. Me sorprendió, francamente, la respuesta de Modibo a mi disculpa y me llenó de aprecio.

Alberto Panamá

Mayor conciencia de lo que es ser humano

Ambas experiencias de diferencia y auto reflexión conducen a una mayor comprensión de la condición humana.107 Los peligros de extrapolar una “naturaleza humana” universal a partir de la experiencia de un solo entorno cultural están bien documentados y la categoría de humanidad universal se ha deconstruido basándose en La falacia de tomar una versión particular como universal.

Sin embargo, existen similitudes y diferencias entre nosotros, y la categoría del ser humano puede ser bastante útil, no solo política sino también éticamente. Si, en lugar de comenzar con una idea a priori de lo que es humano y luego usarla para juzgar y excluir a quienes no encajan en la imagen, comenzamos con el supuesto de que todas las personas son humanas y luego construimos lentamente una idea de humanidad a posteriori, a partir de la experiencia con diferentes seres humanos, podemos comenzar a obtener una comprensión de lo que es ser humano. Si queremos entender la humanidad, de hecho, debemos considerar una variedad de ejemplos y lo que revelan sus diferencias y similitudes. Incluso Judith Butler, quien en su cautela de la historia excluyente de las nociones de la condición humana niega que exista tal condición compartida,108 admite que explorar la diferencia es cómo llegamos a entender lo que es humano. Ella escribe, por ejemplo, “para encontrar lo que funciona, para algunos, como un caso límite para el ser humano es un desafío para repensar al ser humano”, y “la ley de derechos humanos todavía tiene que entender el significado completo de el humano. Podríamos decir que es una tarea continua de los derechos humanos reconcebir a los humanos cuando encuentra que su universalidad putativa no tiene alcance universal “.109

Un esfuerzo por buscar la comprensión de una humanidad compartida a través de la diferencia no depende de la domesticación de esa diferencia. Mehta contrasta la visión de diferencia contenida dentro de una estructura familiar, que él llama “el cosmopolitismo de la razón”, con lo que él llama el “cosmopolitismo de los sentimientos”.110 El cita a Edmund Burke como un ejemplo de la última perspectiva, señalando que el “pensamiento de Burke se proyecta a un nivel que toma en serio los sentimientos, sentimientos y apegos a través de los cuales los pueblos son, y aspiran a estar” en casa .” 111 una visión implica apertura a lo desconocido, “respaldada por la humildad y una preocupación por los sentimientos que dan sentido a la vida de las personas”, y conduce a una conversación arriesgada en la que se puede o no lograr una comprensión a través de los límites de la diferencia. Mehta sugiere que esta perspectiva es cosmopolita, ya que “ofrece la posibilidad, incluso la esperanza, de que a través de la conversación, que tiene como propósito comprender los sentimientos que dan sentido a las vidas de las personas, los lazos de simpatía pueden ser falsificados “.112 Esta perspectiva implica pensar “en términos de conceptos a través de los cuales la coherencia de las vidas de otras personas puede, en principio, hacerse evidente como una realidad concreta y experimentada”,113 y se basa en “una ontología en la que la vida, al menos la vida humana , ocurre dentro del pliegue de un arco de ciertos modos característicos de la experiencia humana que involucran miedo, dolor, interioridad, deseo y un sentido de continuidad que une el pasado y el futuro “.114 Una perspectiva como el” cosmopolitismo de los sentimientos “nos permite buscar entendiendo a través de la diferencia, confiando en que hay algunas cosas que compartimos como seres humanos y, sin embargo, nos negamos a hacer suposiciones detalladas sobre cuáles son.

La autorreflexión también proporciona una vía para una mayor comprensión de la condición humana. Nosotros mismos somos los seres humanos con los que estamos más familiarizados, y la introspección nos permite ver aspectos de la experiencia humana que no podemos discernir de los demás. Aprender más sobre nosotros mismos a través de experiencias de dislocación nos ayuda a comprender mejor lo que es humano en nosotros. Comparar lo que encontramos en nosotros mismos con lo que vemos en otros puede ayudarnos a descubrir similitudes ocultas y también ampliar nuestros conceptos de lo humano. Roy Rappaport delinea tres niveles de significado:

Mientras que el significado de bajo orden está formado por la distinción y el significado de orden medio es transmitido por el descubrimiento o revelación de similitudes (a menudo ocultas) entre cosas aparentemente dispares, lo que llamaré significado de alto orden (en publicaciones anteriores “significado de orden superior”) se basa en la identidad o la unidad, la identificación radical o la unificación del yo con el otro.115

Significado de alto orden

Para Rappaport, “Mientras que el hogar del significado de orden bajo es la taxonomía y el vehículo del significado del orden medio es la metáfora, la participación es el camino hacia el significado de orden alto”.116 La conciencia de la experiencia humana en estos tres niveles de significado es posible a través de las experiencias de la diferencia acompañada de la auto-reflexión.

Cuando descubrimos las diferencias en nuestros idiomas, comida, vestimenta y estilos de vida, aprendemos a través del orden bajo, lo que significa que hay muchas formas de ser humano. Cuando nos damos cuenta de que las diferentes expresiones culturales a menudo surgen de los mismos valores subyacentes, aprendemos a través de un significado de orden medio sobre similitudes humanas inesperadas. Cuando participamos en expresiones comunales de alegría o tristeza, sentimos a través de un orden superior que significa nuestra unidad como seres humanos.

La unidad de significado de alto orden puede parecer estar en conflicto con la importancia, explicada anteriormente, de mantener la pluralidad. Sin embargo, estos momentos de identificación radical están fuera del tiempo ordinario. Aunque la acción no es posible en el estado de unidad, estas experiencias nos enseñan lecciones importantes sobre lo que es ser humano. A medida que avanzamos a través de estos niveles, la conciencia se convierte en una descripción más precisa de lo que ganamos que en la comprensión. Hay un sentido en el que el humano no puede ser descrito o totalmente conocido. Butler encuentra al humano en los límites del lenguaje:

Porque si estoy confundido por ti, entonces ya eres de mí y no estoy en ninguna parte sin ti. No puedo reunir el “nosotros” excepto al encontrar la forma en que estoy atado a “usted”, al tratar de traducir, pero al encontrar que mi propio idioma debe romperse y rendirse si debo conocerlo. Eres lo que gano a través de esta desorientación y pérdida. Así es como el ser humano nace, una y otra vez, como lo que todavía tenemos que saber.117

Incluso la representación visual de lo humano debe fallar, pero al hacerlo nos hace conscientes de lo que no puede contener. Butler argumenta, “el humano no está representado por la cara. Más bien, lo humano se afirma indirectamente en esa misma disyunción que hace quede la representación imposible, y esta disyunción se transmite en la representación imposible “. 118

La representación fallada

Las experiencias interculturales que facilita Tandana hacen posible una mayor conciencia de lo que es ser humano. Cuando llevé a un grupo de voluntarios a Kori- Maoundé, Mali, varios líderes locales nos llevaron en un recorrido por el pueblo. Una parada fue la casa de la gran familia, el edificio que representaba a los fundadores y ancestros del pueblo.

La casa de la familia grande

El jefe, Amadou Napo, explicó que dentro de la casa había una piedra llamada piedra de la preocupación. Si un hombre tuviera demasiadas preocupaciones, podría sentarse en esa piedra, cubrirse la cara con las manos y confesar sus problemas honestamente a los antepasados. A través de este acto encontraría alivio. Cada uno de los voluntarios quería tomar un turno sentado en la piedra, y les pregunté si eso estaría bien. Amadou estuvo de acuerdo, y todos salimos, excepto Susan, que primero se sentaría en la piedra. Cuando nos reunimos afuera de la puerta, Amadou y su compañero Boureima se echaron a reír a carcajadas. Simplemente no podían creer que los estadounidenses también tendrían preocupaciones. Los estadounidenses tenían mucho dinero y asumían que la falta de dinero era la fuente de preocupaciones. Este momento iluminó algo tanto para los anfitriones como para los visitantes, revelándoles a los malienses que el dinero no era la única razón para preocuparse y eliminando cualquier ilusión que los estadounidenses pudieran haber tenido acerca de una vida de aldea más sencilla y sin preocupaciones. Nos sugirió a todos que tal vez parte del ser humano es preocuparse.

Tanto los anfitriones como los visitantes que se encuentran a través de Tandana expresan la conciencia de la humanidad a través de los tres niveles de significado. El voluntario Pat Pahl escribió: “Tengo una nueva percepción sobre la humanidad después de estar en Kansongho! ”119 Cristina Fuerez, de Panecillo, Ecuador, escribe que las experiencias con los norteamericanos le han enseñado que muchas personas” están interesadas en conocer las muchas culturas que existen en el mundo, ya que esto nos diferencia e identifica”,120 destacando el significado de orden bajo. JP Nelson, de California, escribió:” Para las personas que buscan ampliar en gran medida su comprensión de los lazos comunes de la humanidad mientras aprenden sobre el pueblo Otavaleño y sus tradiciones y condiciones actuales, recomiendo altamente a Tandana “,121 aludiendo a ambos significados de orden medio y bajo. Después de describir lo que experimentó en Kansongho, Mali, la voluntaria Julie Lundquist aludió a los dos primeros niveles de significado, escribiendo: “Solo puedo esperar que tanto las diferencias como las similitudes de nuestras culturas se intensifiquen mutuamente. De hecho, somos personas que compartimos mucho más de lo que nunca imaginamos. . . .

A través de mi intención de aprender más sobre las personas increíbles en Kansongho, aprendí mucho sobre mí mismo, sobre vivir plena y felizmente y ¡cuán agradecido estoy por estar vivo! “. Fabian Pinsag, Presidente de Muenala, Ecuador, dijo:” Entendemos El uno al otro. Nos comunicamos, y creo que es un gran logro para los seres humanos, saber que aunque somos de diferentes países, somos uno “,123 insinuando tanto el significado de orden medio y alto. El significado de alto orden de Rappaport tal vez se ejemplifique mejor en la experiencia de Tandana a través de los eventos de bienvenida que los anfitriones malienses ofrecieron a los voluntarios visitantes. La voluntaria Carol Peddie describió la experiencia, rompiendo en llanto mientras recordaba su poder: “Cuando conducíamos en una caravana de vehículos 4×4, toda la comunidad estaba allí con canciones y tambores y brazos abiertos para recibirnos y saludarnos, fue abrumador. Fue emocional, realmente lo fue. . . . Fue una experiencia tan acogedora. No esperaba eso, y obviamente se quedó conmigo “.124 Moverse al ritmo de un gran grupo de personas a ritmos de batería, canciones y disparos de rifle condujo a una inefable sensación de unidad.

105 Arrows 16 and 17 on the diagram.

106 Kearney, 96-97.

107 Arrows 18 and 19 on the diagram.

108 Butler, Judith. Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence (London: Verso, 2004), 20.

109 Ibid., 90-91.

110 Mehta, 20-21.

111 Ibid., 21.

112 Ibid., 22.

113 Ibid., 214.

114 Ibid., 34.

115 Rappaport, Roy A., Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), Kindle Locations 1205-1207.

116 Ibid., Kindle Locations 1213-1214.

117 Butler, 49

118 Ibid., 144, emphasis in original.

119 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

120 Ibid.

121 Ibid.

122 Ibid.

123 Ibid.

Français

Expérimenter la gratitude et Une plus grande conscience de ce que c’est que d’être humain: Partie 7

Le projet de développement comme tentative de «faire avancer» toutes les sociétés dans un continuum supposé est injustifiable. Et pourtant, il y a beaucoup de travail important à faire qui ressemble beaucoup au “développement”. Sans théorie du développement comme cadre directeur, pourquoi faisons-nous ce travail? J’ai essayé d’expliquer les fondements philosophiques du travail de Tandana, en décrivant comment ils conduisaient au travail que nous faisons, mais surtout, à la façon dont nous faisons ce travail.

Dans une série d’articles que vous trouverez ici, j’illustrerai comment les principes sur lesquels Tandana est fondée se concrétisent par des discussions sur mes propres expériences ainsi que sur celles de membres de la communauté et de bénévoles qui ont travaillé avec Tandana. Nous voyons comment le fait de s’approcher aux autres avec une approche personnelle conduit, à la fois en théorie et en pratique, à un monde de plus en plus pacifique et plus juste. Cette approche personnelle pourrait non seulement servir d’élan au travail d’une organisation, mais aussi transformer le caractère et les effets d’autres groupes à la recherche de bonnes relations avec les autres. Il s’agit de la seconde d’une série de 10 publications qui donneront un aperçu à la fois des raisons philosophiques et des effets concrets de la prise de contact avec une approche personnelle.

Si vous avez manqué la Partie 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 et 6, lisez-la ici.

Expérimenter la gratitude

Le partage et le pardon génèrent des expériences de gratitude.105 Quand une personne est gentille avec une autre, la réponse naturelle du destinataire est la gratitude. Lorsque des échanges mutuels ont lieu, l’effet est souvent une gratitude mutuelle. Cette gratitude mutuelle est souvent partagée par les membres de la communauté et les bénévoles de Tandana. Au cours du premier programme de volontaires de Tandana à Kansongho, au Mali, les volontaires ont exprimé leur étonnement devant la générosité des villageois, qui possédaient peu de biens matériels par rapport aux volontaires, mais ils ont également donné gratuitement leurs arachides, vêtements, bijoux et autres comme partager le temps, leurs activités quotidiennes et leur culture avec les visiteurs. Pebelou Tembiné, un des aînés de Kansongho, a exprimé son étonnement devant le fait que ce groupe d’Américains qui n’avaient pas besoin de quitter leur pays s’était déjà rendu si loin pour atteindre Kansongho, puis là-bas, ils ont accepté de porter des pierres au-dessus de leur tête pour aider au projet de construction.

Porter les pierres

Les visiteurs et les hôtes ont été saisis de gratitude pour la franchise, la générosité et la bonne volonté de l’autre. Il y a peu de temps, j’ai reçu la visite d’Alberto Panama, dirigeant de la communauté de Motilón Chupa (Équateur), qui avait récemment reçu un groupe de volontaires de Tandana. “Nous sommes très heureux”, a-t-il déclaré, évoquant l’association communautaire avec Tandana, le soutien de Tandana avec son réservoir d’irrigation et la visite des étudiants volontaires. “Nous sommes heureux”, répondis-je en me souvenant des grande générosité de femmes qui cuisinaient chaque jour de délicieux repas pour les étudiants en visite; l’engagement d’Alberto, qui avait travaillé tard chaque soir pour s’assurer que le char était terminé au moment du départ des élèves; et la joie partagée par Angela, qui a commencé la danse lors de la cérémonie d’adieu. Chacun de nous a exprimé son appréciation de ce que l’autre avait partagé et l’inquiétude de se lasser de l’autre. Nous essayons tous de dissiper l’inquiétude de l’autre, réitérant notre gratitude. Le partage permet des expériences profondes de gratitude mutuelle. Le pardon conduit également à des expériences de gratitude. Comme l’explique Kearney, “le pardon est une” merveille “avec” une certaine gratification “.106 Parce qu’il ne fallait pas s’y attendre, cela suscitait de la gratitude, j’ai été surpris, franchement, de la réponse de Modibo à mes excuses et m’a comblé appréciation.

Alberto Panamá

Une plus grande conscience de ce que c’est que d’être humain

Les expériences de différence et les réflexions sur soi conduisent à une meilleure compréhension de la condition humaine.107 Les dangers d’extrapoler une “nature humaine” universelle à partir de l’expérience d’un seul environnement culturel sont bien documentés et la catégorie de l’humanité universelle a été déconstruite sur la base de l’erreur de prendre une version particulière comme universelle.

Cependant, il existe des similitudes et des différences entre nous, et la catégorie de l’être humain peut être très utile, non seulement sur le plan politique mais aussi sur le plan éthique. Si, au lieu de partir avec une idée a priori de ce qui est humain et de l’utiliser ensuite pour juger et exclure ceux qui ne correspondent pas à l’image, nous partons du principe que tout le monde est humain, puis construisons lentement une idée de l’humanité. a posteriori, à partir de l’expérience avec différents êtres humains, nous pouvons commencer à comprendre ce que c’est que d’être humain. En fait, si nous voulons comprendre l’humanité, nous devons examiner une variété d’exemples et ce qui révèle leurs différences et leurs similitudes. Même Judith Butler, qui, dans sa mise en garde concernant l’histoire d’exclusion des notions de la condition humaine, nie l’existence d’une telle condition partagée108, elle admet qu’explorer la différence est la meilleure façon pour nous de comprendre ce qui est humain. Elle écrit, par exemple, “pour trouver ce qui fonctionne, pour certains, comme limite pour l’être humain est un défi pour repenser l’être humain”, et “la loi des droits de l’homme doit encore comprendre le sens complet. Nous pourrions dire que le respect des droits de l’homme est une tâche continue de ré-concevoir les humains quand ils découvrent que leur universalité supposée n’a pas une portée universelle “.109

Un effort pour rechercher la compréhension d’une humanité partagée à travers la différence ne dépend pas de la domestication de cette différence. Mehta oppose la vision de la différence contenue dans une structure familiale qu’il appelle “le cosmopolitisme de la raison” à ce qu’il appelle le “cosmopolitisme des sentiments”.110 Il cite Edmund Burke comme exemple de cette dernière perspective, soulignant que “la pensée de Burke est projetée à un niveau qui prend au sérieux les sentiments, les sentiments et les attachements à travers lesquels les gens sont et aspirent à être “à la maison “.111 Une vision implique une ouverture sur l’inconnu, “soutenue par l’humilité et le souci des sentiments qui donnent un sens à la vie des gens”, et conduit à une conversation risquée dans laquelle on peut parvenir à une compréhension par les limites de la différence. Mehta suggère que cette perspective est cosmopolite, car “elle offre la possibilité, même l’espoir, que par la conversation, qui a pour but de comprendre les sentiments qui donnent un sens à la vie des gens, les liens de sympathie peuvent être falsifiés “.112 Cette perspective implique de penser “en termes de concepts grâce auxquels la cohérence de la vie des autres peut, en principe, devenir évidente en tant que réalité concrète et expérimentée”113, et repose sur “une ontologie dans laquelle le la vie, au moins la vie humaine, se déroule dans le repli d’un arc de certains modes caractéristiques de l’expérience humaine qui impliquent la peur, la douleur, l’intériorité, le désir et une continuité qui unit le passé et le futur. “114 Une perspective comme le “cosmopolitanisme des sentiments” nous permet de chercher la compréhension par la différence, confiants dans le fait qu’il existe certaines choses que nous partageons en tant qu’êtres humains et, néanmoins, nous refusons de faire des hypothèses détaillées sur ce qu’elles sont.

L’auto-réflexion fournit également un moyen de mieux comprendre la condition humaine. Nous sommes nous-mêmes les êtres humains avec lesquels nous sommes le plus familiers et l’introspection nous permet de voir des aspects de l’expérience humaine que nous ne pouvons pas discerner des autres. En apprendre plus sur nous-mêmes grâce à des expériences de dislocation nous aide à mieux comprendre ce qui est humain en nous. Comparer ce que nous trouvons en nous avec ce que nous voyons chez les autres peut nous aider à découvrir des similitudes cachées et à élargir nos concepts de l’être humain. Roy Rappaport définit trois niveaux de signification:

Alors que le sens de l’ordre inférieur est formé par la distinction et que le sens de l’ordre moyen est transmis par la découverte ou la révélation de similitudes (souvent cachées) entre des choses apparemment différentes, ce que j’appellerai un sens d’ordre élevé (dans les publications précédentes “signifiant ordre supérieur “) repose sur l’identité ou l’unité, l’identification radicale ou l’unification du soi avec l’autre.115

Sens d’ordre élevé

Pour Rappaport, “Bien que l’ordre inférieur soit la taxonomie et que le vecteur du sens de l’ordre moyen soit la métaphore, la participation est le chemin qui mène au sens de l’ordre supérieur”.116 La prise de conscience de l’expérience humaine à ces trois niveaux de signification est possible grâce aux expériences de différence accompagnées d’une réflexion sur soi. Lorsque nous découvrons des différences dans nos langues, notre nourriture, nos vêtements et nos modes de vie, nous apprenons par ordre croissant, ce qui signifie qu’il y a plusieurs façons d’être humain. Lorsque nous nous rendons compte que différentes expressions culturelles découlent souvent des mêmes valeurs sous-jacentes, nous apprenons par un sens moyen des similarités humaines inattendues. Lorsque nous participons à des expressions communes de joie ou de tristesse, nous ressentons un ordre supérieur qui signifie notre unité en tant qu’êtres humains.

L’unité de sens élevé peut sembler en contradiction avec l’importance de maintenir la pluralité expliquée plus haut. Cependant, ces moments d’identification radicale sont en dehors du temps ordinaire. Bien que l’action ne soit pas possible dans l’état d’unité, ces expériences fournissent d’importantes leçons sur ce qu’est l’être humain. En progressant à travers ces niveaux, la conscience devient une description plus précise de ce que nous gagnons que dans la compréhension.

Il y a un sens dans lequel l’humain ne peut pas être décrit ou complètement connu. Butler trouve l’humain dans les limites du langage:

Parce que si je suis confus par vous, alors vous êtes déjà de moi et je ne suis nulle part sans vous. Je ne peux pas rassembler le “nous” sauf pour trouver la façon dont je suis lié à “vous”, en essayant de traduire, mais en constatant que ma propre langue doit être cassée et remise si je le connais. Vous êtes ce que je gagne grâce à cette désorientation et à cette perte. C’est ainsi que l’être humain naît, encore et encore, comme il nous reste le savoir.117

Même la représentation visuelle de l’humain doit échouer, mais en le faisant, elle nous fait prendre conscience de ce qu’elle ne peut pas contenir. Butler soutient que “l’humain n’est pas représenté par le visage. Au contraire, l’humain s’affirme indirectement dans cette même disjonction qui fait de la représentation impossible, et cette disjonction est transmise dans la représentation impossible “.118

La representation echouée

Les expériences interculturelles facilitées par Tandana permettent de mieux prendre conscience de ce qu’est l’humain. Lorsque j’ai emmené un groupe de volontaires à Kori-Maoundé, au Mali, plusieurs dirigeants locaux nous ont fait visiter la ville. Un arrêt était la maison de la grande famille, le bâtiment qui représentait les fondateurs et les ancêtres de la ville.

La grande famille

Le chef, Amadou Napo, a expliqué qu’à l’intérieur de la maison se trouvait une pierre appelée la pierre de l’inquiétude. Si un homme avait trop de soucis, il pourrait s’asseoir sur cette pierre, se couvrir le visage avec ses mains et confesser honnêtement ses problèmes aux ancêtres. À travers cet acte je trouverais un soulagement. Chacun des volontaires voulait prendre place son tour assis sur la pierreet je leur ai demandé si ça irait. Amadou a accepté et nous sommes tous sortis, à l’exception de Susan, qui était la première à s’asseoir sur la pierre. Quand nous nous sommes rassemblés devant la porte, Amadou et son partenaire Boureima ont éclaté de rire. Ils ne pouvaient tout simplement pas croire que les Américains auraient aussi des préoccupations. Les Américains ont beaucoup d’argent et supposent que le manque d’argent était une source de préoccupation. Ce moment a illuminé quelque chose à la fois pour les hôtes et les visiteurs, révélant aux Maliens que l’argent n’était pas la seule raison de s’inquiéter et éliminant toute illusion que les Américains auraient pu avoir sur une vie de village plus simple et insouciante. Il nous a suggéré à tous qu’une partie de l’être humain est peut-être inquiétante.

Les hôtes et les visiteurs qui se rencontrent à travers Tandana expriment la conscience de l’humanité à travers les trois niveaux de signification. Le volontaire Pat Pahl a écrit: “J’ai un nouveau perception de l’humanité après son séjour à Kansongho!119 Cristina Fuerez, de Panecillo, en Équateur, écrit que des expériences avec des Nord-Américains lui ont appris que de nombreuses personnes “s’intéressent à connaître les nombreuses cultures présentes dans le monde, car cela nous différencie et nous identifie”120, soulignant le sens de ” ordre faible, JP Nelson, de Californie, a écrit: ” Pour les personnes qui cherchent à élargir considérablement leur compréhension des liens communs de l’humanité en apprenant à connaître le peuple Otavaleño et ses traditions et conditions actuelles, je recommande vivement Tandana,121 faisant allusion aux significations et à l’ordre bas. Après avoir décrit ce qu’elle a vécu à Kansongho, au Mali, Julie Lundquist, volontaire, a évoqué les deux premiers niveaux de signification en écrivant: “Je ne peux qu’espérer que les différences et les similitudes de nos cultures s’intensifieront. En fait, nous sommes des personnes qui partagent beaucoup plus que nous ne l’avions jamais imaginé. . .

Par mon intention d’apprendre sur les gens extraordinaires de Kansongho, j’ai beaucoup appris sur moi-même, sur une vie pleine et heureuse et sur la reconnaissance de ma vie! ” Fabian Pinsag, président de Muenala, en Équateur, a déclaré: “Nous nous comprenons, nous communiquons et je pense que le fait de savoir que même si nous venons de différents pays est un grand exploit,” est très impressionnant pour les êtres humains “,123 insinuant à la fois le sens d’ordre moyen et élevé. La signification élevée de Rappaport est peut-être mieux illustrée par l’expérience de Tandana à travers les événements d’accueil que les hôtes maliens ont offerts aux volontaires en visite. La bénévole Carol Peddie a décrit l’expérience en pleurant tout en se souvenant de son pouvoir: “Quand nous conduisions dans une caravane de véhicules 4×4, toute la communauté était là avec des chansons et la batterie et les bras ouverts pour nous accueillir et nous saluer, c’était accablant. C’était émotionnel, ça l’était vraiment. . . . . C’était une expérience tellement accueillante. Je ne m’y attendais pas et, évidemment, elle est resté avec moi. Un rythme de tambour, de chants et de coups de fusil entraînés par le rythme d’un grand groupe de personnes a conduit à un sens ineffable de l’unité.

105 Arrows 16 and 17 on the diagram.

106 Kearney, 96-97.

107 Arrows 18 and 19 on the diagram.

108 Butler, Judith. Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence (London: Verso, 2004), 20.

109 Ibid., 90-91.

110 Mehta, 20-21.

111 Ibid., 21.

112 Ibid., 22.

113 Ibid., 214.

114 Ibid., 34.

115 Rappaport, Roy A., Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), Kindle Locations 1205-1207.

116 Ibid., Kindle Locations 1213-1214.

117 Butler, 49

118 Ibid., 144, emphasis in original.

119 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

120 Ibid.

121 Ibid.

122 Ibid.

123 Ibid.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s