Moral Obligations and Meaningful Action: Part 3

The development project as an attempt to bring all societies “forward,” along a supposed continuum, is unjustifiable.  And yet there is much important work to be done that looks very much like, and is even called, “development.”  Without development theory as a guiding framework, why do we do this work?  I have tried to explain the philosophical underpinnings for Tandana’s work, describing how they led to the work we do, but even more importantly, to the way in which we do this work. 

Español

Français

In a series of posts you will find here, I illustrate how the principles on which Tandana is founded play out in concrete application through discussions of my own experiences as well as those of community members and volunteers who have worked with Tandana.  We see how reaching out to others with a personal approach leads, both in theory and in practice, to a world that is, incrementally, more peaceful and more just.  This personal approach could serve not only as impetus for one organization’s work but also to transform the character and effects of other groups seeking right relationship with others.  This is the third in a series of 10 posts that will give insight into both the philosophical reasons and the concrete effects of reaching out to others with a personal approach.  

If you missed Part 1 or Part 2, read them here.

Moral Obligations

Taking a personal approach to others leads us to face-to-face encounters that give rise to moral obligations. As Emmanuel Levinas argues, the, “facing position, opposition par excellence, can only be a moral summons.”14 When we face another person, we are presented with the absolute otherness of that person. According to Levinas, the other person:

opposes to me, not a greater force, an energy assessable and consequently presenting itself as though it were part of a whole, but the very transcendence of his being by relation to that whole; not some superlative of power, but precisely the infinity of transcendence. This infinity, stronger than murder, already resists us in his face, is his face, is the primordial expression, is the first said word: “you shall not commit murder.”15

The face of the other calls me to goodness by showing me a need that is separate from me. To ignore this call, whether by eschewing a personal perspective or by seeking to avoid engagement, is to deny the basic moral imperative of human interaction. The face- to-face interaction is always with a particular other person. It is not, as Adriana Cavarero notes, “the anonymous face of an indistinct and universal alterity – namely, that face of the abstract altruism which is too easily identified as a generic benevolence or pious intention.”16 The relationship is between two unique people.

When I first traveled to Ecuador, I found my self face-to-face with a new host father, host mother, and four host sisters. Just as suddenly, I found myself in new relationships with moral obligations. At first I thought I did not matter much to this family who had opened their doors to a stranger, but when I prepared to go away for a weekend, my host sisters urged me to hurry back because they would miss me. It was clear that what I did mattered to the particular people with whom I was living. Tandana volunteers and hosts continue to experience similar instances of seeing each other and realizing that they have moral obligations to each other. For Kaitlyn Paulsen, a student from the United States who stayed with a host family in Ecuador in 2016, it began with a face-to-face interaction. She writes of her young host sister, “I will never forget the way she would look up into my eyes. In her mind, I was really her second older sister.” Once this relationship was established, Kaitlyn found herself carrying her sleeping sister home after a long day and then walking back up the hill to retrieve her fallen rubber boot.17 Taylor Garry, a U.S. student who stayed with a host family in Ecuador in 2018, wrote, “We had gone beyond the boundaries of a ‘normal’ two-week relationship, and shared interests, material things, and cultures. I was surprised by, but also thankful for the strength of the relationships we formed so quickly.” Taylor then felt a responsibility to make it clear that she had “no plans of forgetting my sister, nor my parents–when I left Muenala, it felt as though I were leaving my biological family behind.”18

Claudia Fuerez (right) with the volunteer and their mothers

Hosts in both Ecuador and Mali express similar sentiments. Claudia Fuerez wrote of a volunteer who stayed with her family in Ecuador, “Without a doubt, she went away very happy to have gotten to know us like her family, which we now are. We were very sad when she left, but she said she would come back; for me she is another sister.”19 Moussa Tembiné and Timothée Dolo, who helped organize a visit of a volunteer group to their village of Kansongho, Mali explained afterwards, “For Kansongho, you were like old friends who had come to work with her and not like people coming for the first time to work in an unknown and unfamiliar situation.”20 Julie Lundquist, an American volunteer who visited Kansongho, highlighted the personal relationships as well: “Welcomed by the entire community, we were also embraced as individuals and ushered into better understanding as the people of Kansongho shared their own personal stories, shared their comforts, worked with us side by side, taught us their songs, celebrated great joys, and spoke of sorrow and hardships.”21

Julie Lundquist

These interactions lead to a sense of moral obligation. Lundquist continues, “May my own words and actions as I continue this journey home and through the rest of my days bring this village honor.”22 Garibou Pamateck, chief of the village of Sal-Dimi, urged his people to respond to the relationship with Tandana by working harder: “The good wind is blowing in our villages. May the committees and the people also change their ideas with this wind. With the happiness that The Tandana Foundation is making in our villages, may the people mobilize to work even better.”23 Lino Pichamba, president of the community of Motilón Chupa in Ecuador, meanwhile, expresses that, “All the members of the community were committed to go out to work together with those volunteers, who came from far away, to collaborate in our initiatives,” showing a sense of moral obligation on the community side as well.24

Garibou Pamateck

Even as an organization, The Tandana Foundation retains some important aspects of the face-to-face relationship. It may seem unlikely that a relational style could work between an NGO and a community, but to a certain degree it does in Tandana’s experience. One of the criteria Tandana staff use in selecting project proposals to support is whether the project forms part of a reciprocal relationship between Tandana and the community or organization. When a particular community gives generously to Tandana volunteers and staff, the relationship strengthens and Tandana recognizes a moral call to give back to that community. Conversely, when a community does not follow through on its part of a collaborative project, Tandana waits longer and requires the community to complete the previous project before it will support a new one. Tandana staff get to know community members well and use this knowledge to inform the relationships between the organization and the communities. Moussa Tembiné, Tandana’s Mali Program Manager, explains, “The foundation is not considered like an NGO. . . this foundation integrates with the people, and the people accept that integration, and there is confidence between the two.”25 Claudia Fuerez, a partner in Ecuador, says, meanwhile, “It’s a foundation that’s different because in addition to helping the community, they help with friendship and intercultural sharing, always respecting our customs.”26

Communities also seem to respond to Tandana in relational ways. In Mali, for example, collective friendships between a village and a group of Tandana volunteers are treated as individual friendships would be. Residents of Kansongho were once offended that Tandana staff planned for a group of volunteers to visit a different village before theirs, since Kansongho was the first and closest friend of Tandana in the area. At the same time, though, an organization cannot act in entirely personal ways. It must avoid the conflicts of interest that could be created by relationships held by one of its leaders, and it must have policies and selection criteria that give a sense of fairness. Tandana’s unique approach has been to fold the primacy of relationships into these policies and criteria.

Meaningful Action

A first-person orientation toward others also maintains a plural space that makes action possible.27 As Levinas notes, “The face in which the other—the absolutely other—presents himself does not negate the same, does not do violence to it . . . As nonviolence it nonetheless maintains the plurality of the same and the other.”28 This plural space is essential for action. As Hannah Arendt explains, “The calamities of action all arise from the human condition of plurality, which is the condition sine qua non for that space of appearance which is the public realm. Hence the attempt to do away with this plurality is always tantamount to the abolition of the public realm itself.”29 Adriana Cavarero highlights the importance of a plural space for the appearance of individuals as who we are, rather than simply what we are. She argues that, the “who is precisely an unrepeatable uniqueness which, in order to appear to others, needs first of all a plural – and therefore political – space of interaction.”30 To act, which reveals who we are, we need a plural space that allows us to maintain our difference.

To maintain this plurality, neither I can be subsumed within the other, nor can I seek to contain the other in what is familiar to me. Cavarero warns of the temptation to eliminate the distinction between other and self, criticizing contemporary philosophy, which, “By continuing to transport the category of alterity into the intimacy of the self, . . . in fact produces the inevitable consequence of impeding every serious naming of the other in so far as he/she is an other.”31 She recognizes that even in intentional efforts to create a space for reciprocal appearance, the desire to assimilate the other can creep in;

The comfort of similarity wins out over the relational status of distinction. The effect – or, perhaps, the empathetic motive for reciprocal narration – thus risks frustrating that reciprocal appearance [comparire] of uniqueness that qualifies the dynamic of recognition as an ethic. To recognize oneself in the other is indeed quite different from recognizing the irremediable uniqueness of the other.32

Instead of seeing self in the other, we must allow the other to remain absolutely different; “The necessary other is indeed here a finitude that remains irremediably an other in all the fragile and unjudgeable insubstitutability of her existing.”33 Levinas goes even further in pointing out that the other must not even be distinguished from me by a particular quality. He argues, “The alterity of the Other does not depend on any quality that would distinguish him from me, for a distinction of this nature would precisely imply between us that community of genus which already nullifies alterity.”34 The development project is founded on a totalizing system in which each extant society fits into a location along a hierarchical continuum. Uday Singh Mehta shows that this perspective is based on “the assumption that the strange is just a variation on what is already familiar, because both the familiar and the strange are deemed to be merely specific instances of a familiar structure of generality.”35 A personal approach must allow the other absolute difference, rather than fitting it into a familiar structure.

The other must not be forced into my categories, but neither should I deny my own identity and uniqueness. Paul Ricoeur asks, “if my identity were to lose all importance in every respect, would not the question of others also cease to matter?” and points out, “must one not, in order to make oneself open, available, belong to oneself in a certain sense?”36 We must make ourselves available to others, but not lose ourselves in them.

Akeel Bilgrami highlights the importance of inhabiting a first-person perspective for the possibility of agency. Agency, Bilgrami argues, “consists in the presence and exercise of a certain point of view.”37 From a third-person point of view, we can only predict, not intend. Bilgrami explains:

When one predicts that one will do something, one steps outside oneself and looks at oneself in a detached way, as an object of causal and motivational histories; that is, one looks at oneself as another might look at one, and so we might call this the third-person point of view. But when one intends to do something, one has not got a detached observer’s angle on oneself; one is rather asking as an agent, “What should I do?” or “What ought I to do?” One is in the first-person point of view.38

It is, of course, possible to switch between these different points of view, but it is essential to return to a first-person perspective in order to act. Traditional development is built on a detached perspective, which its vocabulary illustrates. Bilgrami asks:

1) How and when did we transform the concept of nature into the concept of natural resources? 2) How and when did we transform the concept of human beings into the concept of citizens? 3) How and when did we transform the concept of people into the concept of populations? and 4) How and when did we transform the concept of knowledges to live by into the concept of expertise to rule by?39

Development relies on technical expertise to make use of natural resources, train citizens, and change target populations. As Bilgrami notes, “Expertise ceases to respond to people as people, converts them into populations, something to be studied in a detached way rather than to be engaged with for the needs they have.”40 This framework removes the agency of both those who are considered “agents” of development and those who are considered its “target population.” Neither the first-person perspective nor the plural space is available for human interaction; there are simply processes that must be furthered along to reach a supposed final stage of development. Arendt warns of this consequence of taking a distant perspective on ourselves:

If . . . we return . . . to the discovery of the Archimedean point and apply it, as Kafka warned us not to do, to man himself and to what he is doing on this earth, it at once becomes manifest that all his activities, watched from a sufficiently removed vantage point in the universe, would appear not as activities of any kind but as processes.41

Development is one result of “the attempt to eliminate action because of its uncertainty and to save human affairs from their frailty by dealing with them as though they were or could become the planned products of human making.”42 In order to act, we need to maintain our personal perspectives and our plurality, neither forcing the other into familiar categories nor losing ourselves in that which is different.

Tandana’s personal orientation toward other people in relationship allows for the possibility of action. I began Tandana through simple acts among my friends in Ecuador—a question of whether a community wanted to host a group of traveling students and work together on installing the water pipes they had requested. Tandana staff, community members, and volunteers continue to exercise their collective agency to make changes. And these actions are meaningful because they can reveal who the agents are and because they can be recounted as stories; it is “the revelatory character of action as well as the ability to produce stories and become historical, which together form the very source from which meaningfulness springs into and illuminates human existence.”43 The meaningfulness of Tandana actions is evident in the stories that are told about them. Biné Tembiné of Kansongho, Mali, told a visiting group of Tandana volunteers that he was pleased with their visit because it had coincided with three blessings: the birth of a baby girl, the return of a young man who had been gone for over a decade, and the fact that nobody was injured when the wall of the partially-built grain bank had collapsed. Tandana board member and volunteer Susan Napier explained:

That moment of sitting there with them in their literacy class on the floor, with the babies sleeping in their laps, or again on their backs, with a little tiny piece of slate and an even-smaller, tiny piece of chalk, learning to write and say their letters, and then to have this year a letter written in their own hand, women that I know and are my friends, writing a letter of thanksgiving for being able to read and write in their own language, that to me is the most meaningful thing I’ve ever done in my life, been a part of.44

These meaningful actions are possible because of a first-person perspective within a plural space of appearance.

14 Levinas, Emmanuel, Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority, Alphonso Lingis, trans., (Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1969), 196.
15 Ibid., 199. Emphasis in original.

16 Cavarero, Adriana, Relating Narratives: Storytelling and Selfhood, Paul A. Kottman, trans., (London: Taylor and Francis, 2000), Kindle Edition, 90.

17 Paulsen, Kaitlyn, “All You Need is Love,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog (Spring Valley, Ohio: The Tandana Foundation, December 20, 2016). https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/20/all- you-need-is-love/

18 Garry, Taylor, “Becoming Family in Ecuador,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog (Spring Valley, Ohio: The Tandana Foundation, March 10, 2018). https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2018/03/10/becoming-family-in-ecuador/#more-3306

19 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

20 Ibid.

21 Ibid.

22 Ibid.

23 Ibid.

24 Pichamba Gualacata, José Lino, “Motilón Chupa: a diverse community based on collaboration,” The Tandana Foundation Blog, May 20, 2018 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/20/motilon-chupa-a-diverse-community-based-on- collaboration/ ).

25 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

26 Ibid.

27 Arrow 2 on the diagram.

28 Levinas, 203.

29 Arendt, Hannah, The Human Condition, 2nd ed. (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1998), 220.

30 Cavarero, 58.

31 Cavarero, 43.

32 Ibid., 91.

33 Ibid, 93.

34 Levinas, 194.

35 Mehta, Uday Singh, Liberalism and Empire (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1999), 20.

36 Ricoeur, Paul, Oneself as Another, Kathleen Blamey, trans. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992), 138-139.

37 Bilgrami, Akeel, “What is Enchantment?” in Varieties of Secularism in a Secular Age, Michael Warner, Jonathan VanAntwerpen, and Craig Calhoun, eds. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010), 153.

38 Ibid., emphases in original.

39 Bilgrami, Akeel, Secularism, Identity, and Enchantment (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2014), 133, emphases in original.

40 Ibid., 143.

41 Arendt, 322.

42 Ibid., 230.

43 Ibid., 324.

Español

Obligaciones Morales y Acción Significativa: Part 3

El proyecto de desarrollo como un intento de llevar a todas las sociedades “hacia adelante” a lo largo de un supuesto continuo, es injustificable. Y sin embargo, hay mucho trabajo importante por hacer que se parece mucho, e incluso se llama, “desarrollo”. Sin la teoría del desarrollo como marco guía, ¿por qué hacemos este trabajo? He tratado de explicar los fundamentos filosóficos del trabajo de Tandana, describiendo cómo conducen al trabajo que hacemos, pero más importante aún, a la forma en que hacemos este trabajo.

En una serie de publicaciones que encontrará aquí, ilustre cómo los principios en los que se basa Tandana se llevan a cabo en una aplicación concreta a través de discusiones sobre mis propias experiencias y las de los miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios que han trabajado con Tandana. Vemos cómo llegar a otros con un enfoque personal conduce, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica, a un mundo que es, de manera incremental, más pacífico y más justo. Este enfoque personal podría servir no solo como un impulso para el trabajo de una organización, sino también para transformar el carácter y los efectos de otros grupos que buscan una relación correcta con los demás. Este es el segundo de una serie de 10 publicaciones que dará una idea de las razones filosóficas y los efectos concretos de acercarse a los demás con un enfoque personal.

Si te perdiste la Parte 1 y 2, léelas aquí.

Obligaciones Morales

Tomar un enfoque personal hacia los demás nos lleva a encuentros cara-a-cara que dan lugar a obligaciones morales. Como sostiene Emmanuel Levinas, la “posición enfrentada, oposición por excelencia, solo puede ser una convocatoria moral”.14 Cuando enfrentamos a otra persona, se nos presenta con la otredad absoluta de esa persona. Según Levinas, la otra persona: se opone a mí, no una fuerza mayor, una energía evaluable y, en consecuencia, presentándose como si fuera parte de un todo, sino la mismísima trascendencia de su ser en relación con ese todo; no es un superlativo del poder, sino precisamente la infinidad de la trascendencia. Este infinito, más fuerte que el asesinato, ya se resiste a nosotros en su cara, su rostro, es la expresión primordial, es la primera palabra dicha: “no cometerás homicidio”.15

El rostro del otro me llama a la bondad, mostrándome una necesidad que está separada de mí. Ignorar este llamado, ya sea evitando una perspectiva personal o tratando de evitar el compromiso, es negar el imperativo moral básico de la interacción humana. La interaccion cara -a-cara es siempre con una determinada persona. No es, como advierte Adriana Cavarero, “el rostro anónimo de una alteridad indistinta y universal, es decir, esa cara del altruismo abstracto que se identifica demasiado fácilmente como una benevolencia genérica o una intención piadosa” 16. La relación es entre dos personas únicas.

Cuando viajé por primera vez a Ecuador, me encontré cara a cara con un nuevo padre anfitrión, madre anfitriona y cuatro hermanas anfitrionas. Así de repente, me encontré en nuevas relaciones con las obligaciones morales. Al principio pensé que no le tenía demasiada importancia a esta familia que le había abierto sus puertas a un extraño, pero cuando me preparé para irme por un fin de semana, mis hermanas anfitrionas me instaron a que volviera rapido porque me extrañarían. Estaba claro que lo que hacía le importaba a las personas particulares con las que estaba viviendo. Los voluntarios de Tandana y los anfitriones continúan experimentando casos similares de verse uno al otro y darse cuenta de que tienen obligaciones morales para cada uno. Para Kaitlyn Paulsen, una estudiante de los Estados unidos que se alojó con una familia de acogida en Ecuador en el año 2016, se inició una interacción cara a cara. Ella escribe acerca de su joven hermana anfitriona, “nunca me voy a olvidar de la forma en que me miraba a los ojos. En su mente, era realmente su segunda hermana mayor.” Una vez establecida esta relación, Kaitlyn se encontró llevando a su hermana dormida a casa después de un largo día y luego volviendo a subir la colina para recuperar su bota de goma caída. 17 Taylor Garry, un estudiante estadounidense que se quedó con una familia anfitriona en Ecuador en 2018, escribió,

“Habíamos ido más allá de los límites de una relación ‘normal’ de dos semanas, y compartimos intereses, cosas materiales y cultura. Me sorprendió, pero también me agradó la fuerza de las relaciones que formamos tan rápido “. Taylor sintió la responsabilidad de dejar en claro que “no tenía planes de olvidar a mi hermana, ni a mis padres: cuando dejé Muenala, sentí como si dejara atrás a mi familia biológica”. 18

Claudia Fuerez (derecha) con la voluntaria y sus madres

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Los anfitriones en Ecuador y Mali expresan sentimientos similares. Claudia Fuerez escribió de un voluntario que se alojó con su familia en Ecuador, “Sin duda, ella se fue muy feliz de haber llegado a conocernos como su familia, la que somos ahora. Estábamos muy tristes cuando ella se fue, pero ella dijo que volvería; para mí ella es otra hermana “.19 Moussa Tembiné y Timothée Dolo, quienes ayudaron a organizar la visita de un grupo de voluntarios a su pueblo de Kansongho, Mali explicó después:” Para Kansongho, eras como viejos amigos que habían venido a trabajar con ella. y no como personas que vienen por primera vez a trabajar en una situación desconocida “.20 Julie Lundquist, una voluntaria estadounidense que visitó Kansongho, también destacó las relaciones personales: “Recibidos con beneplácito por toda la comunidad, también fuimos acogidos como individuos y permitimos una mejor comprensión cuando la gente de Kansongho compartió sus propias historias personales, sus comodidades, trabajaron con nosotros al lado del otro, nos enseñaron sus canciones, celebraron grandes alegrías y hablaban de tristezas y dificultades.”21

Julie Lundquist

Estas interacciones conducen a un sentido de obligación moral. Lundquist continúa: “Que mis propias palabras y acciones continúen este viaje a casa y que a través del resto de mis días traigan el honor de esta aldea.” 22 Garibou Pamateck, jefe de la aldea de Sal-Dimi, instó a su pueblo a responder a la relación con Tandana trabajando más duro: “El buen viento sopla en nuestros pueblos. Que los comités y las personas también cambien sus ideas con este viento. Con la felicidad que la Fundación Tandana está logrando en nuestras aldeas, que la gente se movilice para trabajar aún mejor.”23 Lino Pichamba, presidente de la comunidad de Motilón Chupa en Ecuador, mientras tanto, expresa que” todos los miembros de la comunidad comprometidos a trabajar juntos con aquellos voluntarios que vinieron de muy lejos para colaborar en nuestras iniciativas, “mostrando también un sentido de obligación moral en el lado de la comunidad.”24

Garibou Pamateck

Incluso como una organización, Fundación Tandana conserva algunos aspectos importantes de la relacion cara-a-cara. Puede parecer poco probable que un estilo relacional pueda funcionar entre una ONG y una comunidad, pero hasta cierto punto lo hace en la experiencia de Tandana. Uno de los criterios que el personal de Tandana usa en la selección de propuestas de proyectos de apoyo es si el proyecto forma parte de una relación recíproca entre Tandana y la comunidad u organización. Cuando una comunidad en particular brinda generosamente a los voluntarios y al personal de Tandana, la relación se fortalece y Tandana reconoce un llamado moral para devolver a esa comunidad. Por el contrario, cuando una comunidad no cumple con su parte de un proyecto de colaboración, Tandana espera más tiempo y requiere que la comunidad complete el proyecto anterior antes de que sea compatible con uno nuevo. El personal de Tandana conoce a los miembros de la comunidad y usa este conocimiento para informar las relaciones entre la organización y las comunidades. Moussa Tembiné, Gerente del Programa de Tandana en Mali, explica, “La fundación no se considera como una ONG. . . esta fundación se integra con la gente, y la gente acepta esa integración, y hay confianza entre los dos.”25 Claudia Fuerez, una socia en Ecuador, dice, mientras tanto,” Es una fundación que es diferente porque además de ayudar a la comunidad, ayudan con la amistad y el intercambio intercultural, siempre respetando nuestras costumbres.”26

Las comunidades también parecen responder a Tandana en las maneras relacionales. En Malí, por ejemplo, las amistades colectivas entre un pueblo y un grupo de voluntarios de Tandana se tratan como si fueran amistades individuales. Los residentes de Kansongho una vez se sintieron ofendidos de que el personal de Tandana planeara que un grupo de voluntarios visitara una aldea diferente a la suya, ya que Kansongho era el primer y más cercano amigo de Tandana en el área. Al mismo tiempo, sin embargo, una organización no puede actuar de manera totalmente personal. Se deben evitar los conflictos de intereses que podrían crearse por las relaciones que mantiene uno de sus líderes, y debe tener políticas y criterios de selección que le den un sentido de equidad. El único enfoque de Tandana ha sido a veces la primacía de las relaciones en estos criterios y políticas.

Acción Significativa

Una orientación en primera persona hacia los demás también mantiene un espacio plural que hace posible la acción. 27 Como señala Levinas, “el rostro en el que el otro -el otro absolutamente distinto- se presenta a sí mismo no niega lo mismo, no lo violenta. . . Como la no violencia, no obstante, mantiene la pluralidad de lo mismo y lo otro “.28 Este espacio plural es esencial para la acción. Como explica Hannah Arendt, “todas las calamidades de la acción surgen de la condición humana de la pluralidad, que es la condición sine qua non para ese espacio de apariencia que es el dominio público. Por lo tanto, el intento de eliminar esta pluralidad es siempre equivalente a la abolición del dominio público en sí mismo “.29 Adriana Cavarero resalta la importancia de un espacio plural para la apariencia de los individuos como quiénes somos, en lugar de simplemente lo que somos. Ella argumenta que, lo “, que es precisamente una seguridad irrepetible, es el fin de parecerse a los demás, se necesita primero un espacio de interaccion plural – y, por tanto, político.”30 Para actuar, y revelar quiénes somos, necesitamos un espacio plural que nos permita mantener nuestra diferencia.

Para mantener esta pluralidad, ni yo puedo ser subsumido dentro del otro, ni puedo tratar de contener al otro en lo que me es familiar. Cavarero advierte sobre la tentación de eliminar la distinción entre el otro y el yo, criticando la filosofía contemporánea, que, “al continuar transportando la categoría de la alteridad a la intimidad del yo,. . . de hecho, produce la consecuencia inevitable de obstaculizar cada nombramiento serio del otro en la medida en que él / ella es otro “.31 Reconoce que incluso en esfuerzos intencionales para crear un espacio para la apariencia recíproca, el deseo de asimilar al otro puede infiltrarse;

La comodidad de similitud se impone sobre el status relacional de distinción. El efecto -o, tal vez, el motivo empático de la narración recíproca- corre el riesgo de frustrar esa apariencia recíproca [comparativa] de singularidad que califica la dinámica de reconocimiento como una ética. Para reconocer a uno mismo en el otro es de hecho bastante diferente desde el reconocimiento de la irremediable singularidad de los otros.32

En lugar de vernos a nosotros mismos en el otro, debemos permitir que el otro permanezca absolutamente diferente; “El otro necesario es de hecho aquí una finitud que permanece irremediablemente otra en toda la insustancialidad frágil e inadmisible de su existencia”.33 Levinas va incluso más allá al señalar que el otro ni siquiera debe distinguirse de mí por una cualidad particular. Argumenta: “La alteridad del Otro no depende de ninguna cualidad que lo distinga de mí, porque una distinción de esta naturaleza implicaría precisamente entre nosotros esa comunidad de género que ya anula la alteridad.” 34 El proyecto de desarrollo se basa en un sistema totalizador en el cual cada sociedad existente encaja en un lugar a lo largo de un continuo jerárquico. Uday Singh Mehta muestra que esta perspectiva se basa en “la suposición de que lo extraño es solo una variación de lo que ya es familiar, porque tanto lo familiar como lo extraño se consideran simplemente ejemplos específicos de una estructura familiar de generalidad.”35 A el enfoque personal debe permitir la otra diferencia absoluta, en lugar de encajarla en una estructura familiar.

El otro no debe ser forzado en mis categorías, pero tampoco puedo negar mi propia identidad y singularidad. Paul Ricoeur pregunta: “si mi identidad perdiera toda importancia en todos los aspectos, ¿la cuestión de los demás tampoco dejaría de importar?” Y señala: “uno no debe, para estar abierto, disponible, pertenecer a uno mismo”. en cierto sentido?”36 Debemos ponernos a disposición de los demás, pero no perdernos en ellos.

Akeel Bilgrami destaca la importancia de habitar en una perspectiva en primera persona para la posibilidad de agencia. Agencia, Bilgrami argumenta, “consiste en la presencia y el ejercicio de un cierto punto de vista.” 37 Desde un tercer punto de vista, sólo podemos predecir, no pretender. Bilgrami explica:

Cuando uno predice que uno hará algo, uno se sale de sí mismo y se ve a sí mismo de una manera desapegada, como un objeto de historias causales y motivacionales; es decir, uno se ve a sí mismo como otro podría mirarlo, y así podríamos llamarlo el punto de vista de tercera persona. Pero cuando uno tiene la intención de hacer algo, uno no tiene un ángulo de observación separado sobre uno mismo; uno es más bien debe preguntar como agente, “¿Qué debo hacer?” Uno está en el punto de vista de primera persona.38

Por supuesto, es posible cambiar entre estos diferentes puntos de vista, pero es esencial regresar a una perspectiva en primera persona para poder actuar. El desarrollo tradicional está construido sobre una perspectiva de separación, que su vocabulario ilustra. Bilgrami pregunta:

1) ¿Cómo y cuándo transformamos el concepto de naturaleza en el concepto de recursos naturales? 2) ¿Cómo y cuándo transformamos el concepto de los seres humanos en el concepto de ciudadanos? 3) ¿Cómo y cuándo transformamos el concepto de personas en el concepto de poblaciones? y 4) ¿Cómo y cuándo transformamos el concepto de conocimiento para vivir en el concepto de experiencia para gobernar? 39

El desarrollo depende de la experiencia técnica para hacer uso de los recursos naturales, capacitar a los ciudadanos y cambiar las poblaciones objetivo. Como señala Bilgrami, “la experiencia deja de responder a las personas como personas, las convierte en poblaciones, algo que debe estudiarse de forma individual en lugar de comprometerse con las necesidades que tienen”.40 Este marco elimina la agencia de los dos que son considerados “agentes” de desarrollo y aquellos que se consideran su “población objetivo”. Ni la perspectiva en primera persona ni el espacio pleural están disponibles para la interacción humana; simplemente hay procesos que deben ser avanzados para alcanzar una supuesta etapa final de desarrollo. Arendt advierte de esta consecuencia de tomar una perspectiva distante de nosotros mismos:

Si . . . regresamos . . . al descubrimiento del punto de Arquímedes y lo aplicamos, como Kafka nos advirtió que no hiciéramos, a sí mismo y a lo que está haciendo en esta tierra, de inmediato se pone de manifiesto que todas sus actividades, observadas desde un punto de vista suficientemente alejado en el universo, no aparecería como actividades de ningún tipo, sino como procesos. 41

El desarrollo es el resultado de “el intento de eliminar la acción debido a su incertidumbre y salvar los asuntos humanos de su fragilidad al tratarlos como si fueran o pudieran convertirse en los productos planificados de la creación humana.”42 Para poder actuar, necesitamos mantener nuestras perspectivas personales y nuestra pluralidad, sin forzar al otro en categorías familiares ni perdernos en lo que es diferente.

La orientación personal de Tandana hacia otras personas en relación permite la posibilidad de acción. Comencé Tandana a través de actos simples entre mis amigos en Ecuador, una cuestión de si una comunidad quería alojar a un grupo de estudiantes que viajaban y trabajar juntos para instalar las tuberías de agua que habían solicitado. El personal, los miembros de la comunidad y los voluntarios de Tandana continúan ejerciendo su agencia colectiva para realizar cambios. Y estas acciones son significativas porque pueden revelar quiénes son los agentes y porque pueden relatarse como historias; es “el carácter revelador de la acción así como la capacidad de producir historias y convertirse en históricas, que juntas forman la fuente misma desde la cual el significado brota e ilumina la existencia humana” .43 La importancia de las acciones de Tandana es evidente en las historias que son dichas acerca de ellos. Biné Tembiné de Kansongho, Mali, le dijo a un grupo visitante de voluntarios de Tandana que estaba satisfecho con su visita porque había coincidido con tres bendiciones: el nacimiento de una niña, el regreso de un joven que se había ido por más de una década , y el hecho de que nadie resultó herido cuando colapsó la pared del banco de granos parcialmente construido. La miembro de la junta de Tandana y voluntaria Susan Napier explicó:

Ese momento de sentarse con ellos en su clase de alfabetización en el piso, con los bebés durmiendo en sus regazos, o de nuevo en sus espaldas, con una pequeña pieza de pizarra y un trozo de tiza aún más pequeño, aprendiendo a escribir y decir sus cartas, y luego tener este año una carta escrita por ellos mismos, mujeres que conozco y que son mis amigas, escribiendo una carta de agradecimiento por poder leer y escribir en su propio idioma, que para mí es lo más significativo que he hecho en mi vida.44

Estas acciones significativas son posibles debido a una perspectiva en primera persona dentro de un espacio plural de apariencia.

14 Levinas, Emmanuel, Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority, Alphonso Lingis, trans., (Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1969), 196.
15 Ibid., 199. Emphasis in original.

16 Cavarero, Adriana, Relating Narratives: Storytelling and Selfhood, Paul A. Kottman, trans., (London: Taylor and Francis, 2000), Kindle Edition, 90.

17 Paulsen, Kaitlyn, “All You Need is Love,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog (Spring Valley, Ohio: The Tandana Foundation, December 20, 2016). https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/20/all- you-need-is-love/

18 Garry, Taylor, “Becoming Family in Ecuador,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog (Spring Valley, Ohio: The Tandana Foundation, March 10, 2018). https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2018/03/10/becoming-family-in-ecuador/#more-3306

19 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

20 Ibid.

21 Ibid.

22 Ibid.

23 Ibid.

24 Pichamba Gualacata, José Lino, “Motilón Chupa: a diverse community based on collaboration,” The Tandana Foundation Blog, May 20, 2018 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/20/motilon-chupa-a-diverse-community-based-on- collaboration/ ).

25 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

26 Ibid.

27 Arrow 2 on the diagram.

28 Levinas, 203.

29 Arendt, Hannah, The Human Condition, 2nd ed. (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1998), 220.

30 Cavarero, 58.

31 Cavarero, 43.

32 Ibid., 91.

33 Ibid, 93.

34 Levinas, 194.

35 Mehta, Uday Singh, Liberalism and Empire (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1999), 20.

36 Ricoeur, Paul, Oneself as Another, Kathleen Blamey, trans. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992), 138-139.

37 Bilgrami, Akeel, “What is Enchantment?” in Varieties of Secularism in a Secular Age, Michael Warner, Jonathan VanAntwerpen, and Craig Calhoun, eds. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010), 153.

38 Ibid., emphases in original.

39 Bilgrami, Akeel, Secularism, Identity, and Enchantment (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2014), 133, emphases in original.

40 Ibid., 143.

41 Arendt, 322.

42 Ibid., 230.

43 Ibid., 324.

Français

Obligations Morales et Action significative: Partie 3

 

Le projet de développement comme tentative de «faire avancer» toutes les sociétés dans un continuum supposé est injustifiable. Et pourtant, il y a beaucoup de travail important à faire qui ressemble beaucoup au “développement”. Sans théorie du développement comme cadre directeur, pourquoi faisons-nous ce travail? J’ai essayé d’expliquer les fondements philosophiques du travail de Tandana, en décrivant comment ils conduisaient au travail que nous faisons, mais surtout, à la façon dont nous faisons ce travail.

Dans une série d’articles que vous trouverez ici, j’illustrerai comment les principes sur lesquels Tandana est fondée se concrétisent par des discussions sur mes propres expériences ainsi que sur celles de membres de la communauté et de bénévoles qui ont travaillé avec Tandana. Nous voyons comment le fait de s’approcher aux autres avec une approche personnelle conduit, à la fois en théorie et en pratique, à un monde de plus en plus pacifique et plus juste. Cette approche personnelle pourrait non seulement servir d’élan au travail d’une organisation, mais aussi transformer le caractère et les effets d’autres groupes à la recherche de bonnes relations avec les autres. Il s’agit de la seconde d’une série de 10 publications qui donneront un aperçu à la fois des raisons philosophiques et des effets concrets de la prise de contact avec une approche personnelle.

Si vous avez manqué la Partie 1 et 2, lisez-la ici.

Obligations Morales

Adopter une approche personnelle vis-à-vis des autres conduit à des rencontres face à face qui entraînent des obligations morales. Comme le soutient Emmanuel Levinas, «la position opposée, l’opposition par excellence, ne peut être qu’un appel moral14». Lorsque nous faisons face à une autre personne, nous nous trouvons face à l’altérité absolue de cette personne. Selon Levinas, l’autre personne: s’oppose à moi, non une force plus grande, une énergie évaluable et, par conséquent, à se présenter comme faisant partie d’un tout, mais à la transcendance même de son être par rapport à cet ensemble; Ce n’est pas un superlatif de pouvoir, mais précisément l’infini de la transcendance. Cet infini, plus fort que le meurtre, nous résiste déjà dans son visage, son visage, est l’expression primordiale, c’est le premier mot dit: “tu ne commettras pas d’homicide.” 15

Le visage de l’autre m’appelle à la bonté, ça me montre un besoin distinct de moi. Ignorer cet appel, que ce soit en évitant une perspective personnelle ou en essayant d’éviter un compromis, revient à nier l’impératif moral fondamental de l’interaction humaine. L’interaction face-à-face est toujours avec une certaine personne. Ce n’est pas, comme le prévient Adriana Cavarero, «le visage anonyme d’une altérité indistincte et universelle, c’est-à-dire le visage de l’altruisme abstrait qui est trop facilement identifié comme une bienveillance générique ou une intention pieuse.»16 La relation est entre deux personnes uniques .

Quand j’ai voyagé en Équateur pour la première fois, je me suis retrouvé face à un nouveau père d’accueil, à une mère d’accueil et à quatre sœurs hôtes. Tout à coup, je me suis retrouvé dans de nouvelles relations avec les obligations morales. Au début, je pensais que je ne me souciais pas beaucoup de cette famille qui avait ouvert ses portes à un étranger, mais quand je me suis préparée à partir pour un week-end, mes sœurs d’accueil m’ont exhortée à revenir rapidement car elles me manqueraient. Il était clair que ce que j’ai fait était important pour les personnes avec lesquelles je vivais. Les volontaires de Tandana et les hôtes continuent l’expérience de se voir et de se rendre compte qu’ils ont des obligations morales les uns pour les autres. Pour Kaitlyn Paulsen, une étudiante des États-Unis qui a séjourné dans une famille d’accueil en Équateur en 2016, une interaction face à face a commencé. Elle écrit à propos de sa jeune soeur hôte: «Je n’oublierai jamais la façon dont elle me regardait dans les yeux. Dans sa tête, c’était vraiment sa deuxième grande soeur. ” Une fois cette relation établie, Kaitlyn s’est retrouvée à ramener chez elle sa sœur endormie après une longue journée, puis à remonter la colline pour récupérer sa botte de caoutchouc tombée.17 Taylor Garry, un étudiant américain qui a séjourné dans une famille d’accueil en Équateur en 2018, il a écrit :

«Nous avions dépassé les limites d’une relation« normale »de deux semaines et nous partagions les intérêts, les choses matérielles et la culture. Cela m’a surpris, mais j’ai aussi aimé la force des relations que nous avons formées si rapidement. ” Taylor a senti la responsabilité de préciser que “je n’avais pas l’intention d’oublier ma soeur ou mes parents: quand j’ai quitté Muenala, j’ai eu l’impression de laisser ma famille biologique derrière moi.” 18

Claudia Fuerez (à droite) avec le volontaire et ses mères

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Les hôtes de l’Équateur et du Mali expriment des sentiments similaires. Claudia Fuerez a écrit à propos d’une volontaire qui est restée avec sa famille en Équateur., “Sans aucun doute, elle était très heureuse de nous connaître comme sa famille, ce que nous sommes maintenant. Nous étions très tristes quand elle est partie, mais elle a dit qu’elle reviendrait;19 Moussa Tembiné et Timothée Dolo, qui ont aidé à organiser la visite d’un groupe de volontaires dans leur ville de Kansongho, au Mali, ont ensuite expliqué: “Pour Kansongho, vous étiez comme de vieux amis qui étaient venus travailler avec elle, et pas comme personnes qui viennent pour la première fois travailler dans une situation inconnue. “20 Julie Lundquist, une volontaire américaine qui a visité Kansongho, a également souligné les relations personnelles: «Accueillis par toute la communauté, nous avons également été accueillis en tant qu’individus et avons permis une meilleure compréhension lorsque les habitants de Kansongho ont partagé leurs histoires personnelles, leur confort, ils ont travaillé avec nous côte à côte, nous ont appris leurs chansons, célébré de grandes joies et ils ont parlé de tristesse et de difficultés.”21

Julie Lundquist

Ces interactions entraînent un sentiment d’obligation morale. Lundquist poursuit: “Que mes propres paroles et actions continuent ce voyage chez moi et que tout au long de mes jours apporte l’honneur de ce village.”22 Garibou Pamateck, chef du village de Sal-Dimi, a exhorté son peuple à répondre à la relation avec Tandana en travaillant plus fort: «Le bon vent souffle dans nos villages. Nous souhaitons que les comités et les gens changent aussi leurs idées avec ce vent. Avec le bonheur que la Fondation Tandana réalise dans nos villages, que la population se mobilise pour travailler encore mieux »23. Lino Pichamba, président de la communauté de Motilón Chupa en Équateur, a déclaré que “tous les membres de la communauté se sont engagés à collaborer avec les volontaires venus de loin pour collaborer à nos initiatives”. “montrant également un sens de l’obligation morale du côté de la communauté”.24

Garibou Pamateck

Même en tant qu’organisation, la Fondation Tandana conserve certains aspects importants de la relation face à face. Il peut sembler improbable qu’un style relationnel puisse fonctionner entre une ONG et une communauté, mais jusqu’à un certain point l’expérience de Tandana le rend possible. L’un des critères utilisés par le personnel de Tandana dans la sélection des propositions de projets de soutien est de savoir si le projet fait partie d’une relation réciproque entre Tandana et la communauté ou l’organisation. Lorsqu’une communauté en particulier fournit généreusement aux volontaires et au personnel de Tandana, la relation est renforcée et Tandana reconnaît un appel moral à retourner à cette communauté. Au contraire, quand une communauté ne remplit pas sa part de projet collaboratif, Tandana attend plus longtemps et demande à la communauté de terminer le projet précédent avant qu’il soit compatible avec un nouveau. Le personnel de Tandana connaît les membres de la communauté et utilise ces connaissances pour informer les relations entre l’organisation et les communautés. Moussa Tembiné, responsable du programme Tandana au Mali, explique: «La fondation n’est pas considérée comme une ONG. . . cette fondation s’intègre avec les gens, et les gens sont d’accord avec cette intégration, et il y a de la confiance entre les deux.“25 Claudia Fuerez, associée en Équateur, a déclaré:” Il s’agit d’une fondation différente car, en plus d’aider la communauté, elle aide à l’amitié et aux échanges interculturels, toujours dans le respect de nos coutumes.”26

Les communautés semblent également répondre à Tandana dans les moyens relationnels. Au Mali, par exemple, les amitiés collectives entre un village et un groupe de volontaires de Tandana sont traitées comme si elles étaient des amitiés individuelles. Les habitants de Kansongho se sont sentis offensés que le personnel de Tandana ait prévu qu’un groupe de volontaires a visité un village différent du leur, Kansongho était le premier et le plus proche ami de Tandana dans la région. Au même temps, cependant, une organisation ne peut pas agir d’une façon très personnelle. Les conflits d’intérêts pouvant être créés par les relations entretenues par l’un de ses dirigeants doivent être évités, et des politiques et des critères de sélection doivent être adoptés pour lui donner un sens de l’équité. La priorité de Tandana a parfois été la primauté des relations dans ces politiques et critères.

Action significative

Une orientation à la première personne envers les autres maintient également un espace pluriel qui rend possible l’action.27 Comme le souligne Levinas, «le visage sur lequel l’autre – l’autre absolument différent – se présente ne le nie pas, ne le viole pas. . . Comme la non-violence, cependant, maintient la pluralité du même et de l’autre.»28 Cet espace pluriel est essentiel à l’action. Comme l’explique Hannah Arendt, “toutes les calamités de l’action découlent de la condition humaine de la pluralité, qui est la condition sine qua non de cet espace d’apparition qui est le domaine public. Par conséquent, la tentative d’éliminer cette pluralité équivaut toujours à l’abolition du domaine public lui-même»29 Adriana Cavarero souligne l’importance d’un espace pluriel pour l’apparence des individus comme qui nous sommes, plutôt que simplement ce que nous sommes. Elle soutient que “ce qui est précisément une sécurité irremplaçable est le but de ressembler aux autres, tout d’abord un espace d’interaction pluriel est nécessaire – et donc politique.”30 Pour agir et révéler qui nous sommes, nous avons besoin d’un espace pluriel qui nous permet de maintenir notre différence.

Pour maintenir cette pluralité, je ne peux pas être englobé dans l’autre, je ne peux pas non plus essayer de contenir l’autre dans ce qui m’est familier. Cavarero met en garde contre la tentation d’éliminer la distinction entre l’autre et soi, critiquant la philosophie contemporaine qui, “en continuant à transporter la catégorie de l’altérité dans l’intimité de soi”. . . en fait, il produit l’inévitable conséquence de l’obstruction de chaque nomination sérieuse de l’autre dans la mesure où il / elle est une autre.»31 Il reconnaît que, même dans les efforts visant intentionnellement à créer un espace pour l’apparence réciproque, le désir d’assimilation à l’autre peut s’infiltrer; Le confort de la similitude est imposé au statut relationnel de distinction. L’effet – ou peut-être le motif empathique du récit réciproque – risque de contrecarrer cette apparence [comparative] réciproque de singularité qui qualifie la dynamique de la reconnaissance d’éthique. Pour reconnaître soi-même dans l’autre, est en fait très différente de la reconnaissance du caractère irrémédiable de la singularité de l’autre.32

Au lieu de nous voir dans l’autre, il faut permettre à l’autre de rester absolument différent; “L’autre nécessaire est en effet ici une finitude qui reste irrémédiablement une autre dans toute l’insubstantialité fragile et inadmissible de son existence”.33 Levinas va encore plus loin en soulignant que l’autre ne doit même pas se distinguer de moi par une qualité particulière. Il soutient que “l’altérité de l’Autre ne dépend d’aucune qualité qui la distingue de moi, car une distinction de cette nature impliquerait précisément parmi nous une communauté de genre qui annule déjà une altérité”.34 Le projet de développement repose sur un système totalisant dans lequel chaque société existante s’inscrit dans un continuum hiérarchique. Uday Singh Mehta montre que cette perspective repose sur “l’hypothèse que l’étrange n’est qu’une variation de ce qui est déjà familier, car le familier et l’étrange sont simplement considérés comme des exemples spécifiques d’une structure familiale de généralité.”35 Une approche personnelle doit permettre l’autre différence absolue, au lieu de l’inclure dans une structure familiale.

L’autre ne doit pas être forcé dans mes catégories, mais je ne peux pas nier ma propre identité et singularité. Paul Ricoeur demande: “Si mon identité perdait toute importance à tous égards, la question des autres ne serait-elle pas aussi importante?” Et il fait remarquer que “il ne faut pas être ouvert, disponible, appartenir à soi-même”. dans un certain sens?”36 Nous devons nous rendre disponibles aux autres, mais nous ne devons pas nous y perdre.

Akeel Bilgrami souligne l’importance de vivre dans une perspective de première personne pour la possibilité d’une agence. Bilgrami affirme que l’agence “consiste en la présence et l’exercice d’un certain point de vue.»37 D’un troisième point de vue, nous ne pouvons que prédire, pas prétendre. Bilgrami explique:

Quand on prédit qu’on va faire quelque chose, on sort de soi et se voit de manière détachée, comme objet de récits de causalité et de motivation; c’est-à-dire que quelqu’un se voit comme un autre peut le regarder et nous pourrions l’appeler le point de vue de la troisième personne. Mais quand on a l’intention de faire quelque chose, on n’a pas un angle d’observation distinct sur soi-même; on doit plutôt demander en tant qu’agent: “Que dois-je faire?” On est dans le point de vue de la première personne.38

Bien entendu, il est possible de changer entre ces différents points de vue, mais il est essentiel de revenir à une perspective en première personne pour agir. Le développement traditionnel est construit sur la perspective de séparation, illustrée par son vocabulaire. Bilgrami demande:

1) Quand et comment pouvons-nous transformer le concept de nature dans la notion de ressources naturelles? 2) Quand et comment pouvons-nous transformer le concept d’êtres humains dans le concept de citoyens? 3) Comment et quand transformons-nous le concept de personnes en concept de populations? et 4) comment et quand transformons-nous le concept de connaissance pour vivre le concept d’expérience à gouverner?39

Le développement dépend de la technique d’expérience pour utiliser des ressources naturelles, former les citoyens et changer les populations cibles. Comme Bilgrami le souligne, «l’expérience cesse de répondre aux personnes en tant que personnes, elle les convertit en populations, ce qui doit être étudié individuellement au lieu de répondre aux besoins qu’elles ont.» 40 Ce cadre élimine l’agence des deux considérés comme des “agents” de développement et ceux qui sont considérés comme leur “population cible”. Ni la perspective à la première personne ni l’espace pleural sont disponibles pour l’interaction humaine; il y a simplement des processus qui doivent être avancés pour atteindre à une supposée phase finale de développement. Arendt met en garde contre cette conséquence de prendre une perspective lointaine de nous-mêmes:

Si . . . On retourne. . . si la découverte du point d’Archimède est appliquée, comme Kafka nous a averti de ne pas le faire, à lui-même et à ce qu’il fait sur cette terre, il devient immédiatement clair que toutes ses activités, observées d’un point de vue suffisamment éloigné dans l’univers, n’apparaîtrait pas comme des activités d’aucune sorte, mais comme des processus. 41

Le développement est le résultat de “la tentative d’éliminer l’action en raison de son incertitude et de sauver les affaires humaines de leur fragilité en les traitant comme si elles étaient ou pourraient devenir les produits planifiés de la création humaine” 42. Pour agir, nous devons maintenir nos perspectives personnelles et notre pluralité sans forcer l’autre dans des catégories familières ou nous perdre dans ce qui est différent.

L’orientation personnelle de Tandana vis-à-vis des autres permet la possibilité d’agir. J’ai initié Tandana à travers des gestes simples parmi mes amis en Équateur, une question de savoir si une communauté voulait loger un groupe d’étudiants en voyage et travailler ensemble pour installer les conduites d’eau demandées. Le personnel, les membres de la communauté et les volontaires continuent à exercer leur agence collective pour apporter des modifications. Et ces actions sont importantes car elles peuvent révéler qui sont les agents et pourquoi ils peuvent être racontés comme des histoires; c’est «le caractère révélateur de l’action, ainsi que la capacité à produire des histoires et à devenir historiques, qui forment ensemble la source même du sens et de l’illumination de l’existence humaine.»43 L’importance des actions de Tandana est évidente dans les histoires qui sont dites à leur sujet. Biné Tembiné de Kansongho, au Mali, a déclaré à un groupe de volontaires de Tandana qu’il était satisfait de sa visite car il avait coïncidé avec trois bénédictions: la naissance d’une fille, retour d’un jeune homme parti depuis plus de dix ans. , et le fait que personne n’a été blessé lorsque le mur de la banque de grains partiellement construite s’est effondré. Le membre du conseil d’administration de Tandana, et volontaire Susan Napier a expliqué:

Ce moment de s’asseoir avec eux dans leur cours d’alphabétisation sur le sol, avec des bébés dormant dans leurs genoux ou sur le dos, avec un petit morceau d’ardoise et un morceau de craie encore plus petit, apprenant à écrire et à dire Vos lettres, et ensuite cette année une lettre écrite par eux-mêmes, des femmes que je connais et qui sont mes amis, écrivant une lettre de remerciement pour pouvoir lire et écrire dans leur propre langue, ce qui est pour moi la chose la plus significative ma vie.44

Ces actions significatives sont possibles grâce à une perspective en première personne dans un espace d’apparence pluriel.

SONY DSC

14 Levinas, Emmanuel, Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority, Alphonso Lingis, trans., (Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1969), 196.
15 Ibid., 199. Emphasis in original.

16 Cavarero, Adriana, Relating Narratives: Storytelling and Selfhood, Paul A. Kottman, trans., (London: Taylor and Francis, 2000), Kindle Edition, 90.

17 Paulsen, Kaitlyn, “All You Need is Love,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog (Spring Valley, Ohio: The Tandana Foundation, December 20, 2016). https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/20/all- you-need-is-love/

18 Garry, Taylor, “Becoming Family in Ecuador,” in The Tandana Foundation Blog (Spring Valley, Ohio: The Tandana Foundation, March 10, 2018). https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2018/03/10/becoming-family-in-ecuador/#more-3306

19 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

20 Ibid.

21 Ibid.

22 Ibid.

23 Ibid.

24 Pichamba Gualacata, José Lino, “Motilón Chupa: a diverse community based on collaboration,” The Tandana Foundation Blog, May 20, 2018 (https://tandanafoundationblog.wordpress.com/2018/05/20/motilon-chupa-a-diverse-community-based-on- collaboration/ ).

25 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018. http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html

26 Ibid.

27 Arrow 2 on the diagram.

28 Levinas, 203.

29 Arendt, Hannah, The Human Condition, 2nd ed. (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1998), 220.

30 Cavarero, 58.

31 Cavarero, 43.

32 Ibid., 91.

33 Ibid, 93.

34 Levinas, 194.

35 Mehta, Uday Singh, Liberalism and Empire (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1999), 20.

36 Ricoeur, Paul, Oneself as Another, Kathleen Blamey, trans. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992), 138-139.

37 Bilgrami, Akeel, “What is Enchantment?” in Varieties of Secularism in a Secular Age, Michael Warner, Jonathan VanAntwerpen, and Craig Calhoun, eds. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010), 153.

38 Ibid., emphases in original.

39 Bilgrami, Akeel, Secularism, Identity, and Enchantment (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2014), 133, emphases in original.

40 Ibid., 143.

41 Arendt, 322.

42 Ibid., 230.

43 Ibid., 324.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s