Caring and Compassion: Part 9

The development project as an attempt to bring all societies “forward,” along a supposed continuum, is unjustifiable.  And yet there is much important work to be done that looks very much like, and is even called, “development.”  Without development theory as a guiding framework, why do we do this work?  I have tried to explain the philosophical underpinnings for Tandana’s work, describing how they led to the work we do, but even more importantly, to the way in which we do this work. 

Español

Français

In a series of posts you will find here, I illustrate how the principles on which Tandana is founded play out in concrete application through discussions of my own experiences as well as those of community members and volunteers who have worked with Tandana.  We see how reaching out to others with a personal approach leads, both in theory and in practice, to a world that is, incrementally, more peaceful and more just.  This personal approach could serve not only as impetus for one organization’s work but also to transform the character and effects of other groups seeking right relationship with others.  This is the ninth in a series of 10 posts that will give insight into both the philosophical reasons and the concrete effects of reaching out to others with a personal approach.  

If you missed Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 or 8, read them here.

Caring

Experiences of mutual gratitude bring us to care about each other.156 The Kansongho hosts and visiting volunteers who were filled with gratitude for one another also came to care about each other. According to Moussa Tembiné and Timothée Dolo, who had arranged the visit, “for Kansongho, you were like old friends . . . The people are asking when will be the next visit of the group.”157 The volunteers showed their care for their new friends by raising money to add 16 tons of millet to the village’s grain bank to help the residents of Kansongho through a particularly difficult dry season. Caring leads to more sharing, which, in turns leads to more gratitude and more caring in a virtuous cycle.158 Caring about someone also gives us a desire to maintain the relationship with that person. If I care about you, I want to stay in friendship with you. That desire, in turn, provides an added impetus both to seek and to offer forgiveness when the need arises, creating another virtuous cycle.159

The care that fits into this cycle is of a personal rather than an anonymous sort. Lisa Stevenson distinguishes between personal and anonymous care. She contrasts “‘biopolitical’ . . . care and governance that is primarily concerned with the maintenance of life itself, and is directed at populations rather than individuals” with “care as the way someone comes to matter and the corresponding ethics of attending to the other who matters.”160 She calls the former kind of care anonymous, explaining, that “In a bureaucracy decisions are supposed to be based on rules rather than relationships, and decision makers are often following protocols rather than their own sense of right,”161 and that “in anonymous forms of care, personal connections are supposed to be suppressed.”162 For her, “anonymous care is concerned more with what a human being is than who.”163 In personal care, by contrast, “‘life’ as an abstraction has little value, yet specific relationships to others, both dead and alive, matter profoundly.”164 She asks, “What is friendship if not a willingness to act in an interested way on a friend’s behalf?”165 As a face-to-face interaction is always with a particular other person, personal care always attaches to a particular friend. That person matters to us. As an organization, Tandana must balance personal care, to show its partners that they matter, with policies and criteria that offer a measure of fairness and prevent inappropriate conflicts of interest.

Compassion

Caring with respect leads to compassion.166 As Palmer notes, “Compassion means, literally, the capacity to be with the suffering of another.”167 To be with another’s suffering, we must both care about the other enough to be willing to suffer for her sake and respect her enough to see ourselves on the same level, and thus, with her. We cannot suffer with someone from above. As Palmer argues:

That is always our temptation when we set out to do good—to do it in a way that leaves us above the fray. But our desire to stay above it all reveals our misunderstanding of right action. Action that distances us from “the other” can never be right; we cannot do good by standing back and pulling levers that drop bounty on people who need it. Right action can be only an immersion of ourselves in reality, an immersion that involves us in relationship, that takes us to our place in the organic nature of things.168

Compassion “means to be there in whatever way possible, to share the circumstances of another’s life as much as one can—not to add to the world’s pool of suffering, but to gain intimate understanding of what the other requires.”169 According to Palmer, “[t]here is no arm’s length ‘solution’ for suffering, and people who offer such only add to the pain. But there is comfort and even healing in the presence of people who know how to be with others, how to be fully there.”170 Furthermore, in his view, “suffering can never be solved. It can only be shared in compassion, shared in community, and every effort to put ourselves in charge of the relief effort weakens the very sharing in which our hope resides.”171 When we both care for and respect people, we refrain from attempts to fix them or be in charge of their efforts to improve their situations. Instead, we accompany them, sharing experiences and working together.

Before even thinking about starting Tandana, I sought to immerse myself in an unfamiliar reality. I found that by spending time with my host family in Panecillo I learned a great deal. In the early years, I often had nothing really to do, and I tried to simply be with my host family, which required me to develop greater patience and jettison task-driven attitudes about “wasting time.” I found that by listening, fully present, to my host mother’s worries and sorrows, I could do nothing to solve them but I could make them slightly easier to bear. Only after spending a lot of time with my friends in the community and learning about their goals and dreams did I start to think of ways to collaborate with them in hopes of together making things better. When I first went to Mali, I purposefully arrived without a project in mind, seeking instead to learn and get to know people and to be with them. However, it was very difficult simply to be with people without a role or structure. The people I met thought it was novel and a bit refreshing that, unlike the Westerners they were familiar with, I had not arrived with a set project in mind, a goal to fix a particular problem I assumed they had. Yet, they also did not know what to do with me, how to help me, or how to benefit from my presence. It was difficult for me to bear the lack of direction and lack of structure for interaction with people, with a simultaneous lack of any sense of value in what I was doing. It was similarly difficult for my hosts to put up with me, since I seemed to be doing nothing worthwhile. Slowly, though, we began to care for and respect each other, and eventually those sentiments developed into compassion.

Tandana continues to seek a compassionate manner of collaborating. Through their experiences with Tandana, volunteers sometimes come to a greater understanding of the importance of being with others, rather than trying to help from above. For Susie Anderson, a volunteer from Minnesota, a Tandana experience helped her learn to be with people, rather than just accomplishing things; she noted, “It has made me slow down and not to be so task driven. Relationships are most important.”172 J.P. Nelson felt the importance of working with people, rather than try to help them; he remarked, “I don’t feel like I helped anyone else. Rather, I worked with people, and through that, we both learned, and my kids and I came away changed.”173 Maggie Kaus wrote, “The entire experience didn’t feel like I was doing volunteer work from far away, but more as if I were doing it in my own community.”174 Mitzi Moye, who brought several groups of students to work with Tandana, appreciates, “the opportunity to actively support an excellent foundation that I know is rooted in respect and love.”175 Community members also see compassion in their interactions with Tandana. Segundo Moreta wrote, “Seeing how the world is today, it brings me happiness to know that there are people who think of others at the expense of their own health. . . . Congratulations for your tireless work for the last 10 years and your sacrifice for others.”176

Segunda Moreta (right)

Seguemo Tembiné, chief of Kansongho, told his son as he neared the end of his life: The Americans chose to travel millions of kilometers to come here and share their love. I am proud to leave with this good memory. My son, do everything you can with Tandana’s leaders to continue the cooperation between my people and their people and to prove to the rest of the world that Tandana’s love of their neighbor doesn’t know any geographical borders.177

Seguemo Tembiné

153 Ibid.

154 Ibid.

155 Ibid.

156 Arrow 23 on the diagram.

157 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

158 Arrows 24, 16, and 23 on the diagram.

159 Arrows 25, 26, 17, and 23 on the diagram.

160 Stevenson, Lisa, Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic (Oakland: University of California Press, 2014), 3.

161 Ibid., 60.

162 Ibid., 85.

163 Ibid., 107.

164 Ibid., 125.

165 Ibid., 76.

166 Arrows 27 and 28 on the diagram.

167 Palmer, Parker, The Active Life, 83.

168 Ibid., 84.

169 Ibid.

170 Ibid., 84-85.

171 Ibid., 97.

172 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

173 Ibid.

174 Ibid.

175 Ibid.

176 Ibid.

Español

Cuidar y Compasión: Parte 9

El proyecto de desarrollo como un intento de llevar a todas las sociedades “hacia adelante” a lo largo de un supuesto continuo, es injustificable. Y sin embargo, hay mucho trabajo importante por hacer que se parece mucho, e incluso se llama, “desarrollo”. Sin la teoría del desarrollo como marco guía, ¿por qué hacemos este trabajo? He tratado de explicar los fundamentos filosóficos del trabajo de Tandana, describiendo cómo conducen al trabajo que hacemos, pero más importante aún, a la forma en que hacemos este trabajo.

En una serie de publicaciones que encontrará aquí, ilustre cómo los principios en los que se basa Tandana se llevan a cabo en una aplicación concreta a través de discusiones sobre mis propias experiencias y las de los miembros de la comunidad y voluntarios que han trabajado con Tandana. Vemos cómo llegar a otros con un enfoque personal conduce, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica, a un mundo que es, de manera incremental, más pacífico y más justo. Este enfoque personal podría servir no solo como un impulso para el trabajo de una organización, sino también para transformar el carácter y los efectos de otros grupos que buscan una relación correcta con los demás. Este es el noveno de una serie de 10 publicaciones que dará una idea de las razones filosóficas y los efectos concretos de acercarse a los demás con un enfoque personal.

Si te perdiste la Parte 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, y 8, léelas aquí.

Cuidar

Las experiencias de gratitud mutua nos hacen preocuparnos mutuamente.156 Los anfitriones de Kansongho y los voluntarios visitantes que se llenaron de gratitud entre sí también vinieron a preocuparse unos por otros. Según Moussa Tembiné y Timothée Dolo, quienes habían organizado la visita, “para Kansongho, ustedes eran como viejos amigos. . . La gente pregunta cuándo será la próxima visita del grupo “.157 Los voluntarios demostraron su cuidado por sus nuevos amigos al recaudar dinero para agregar 16 toneladas de mijo al banco de granos de la aldea para ayudar a los residentes de Kansongho a través de una sequía particularmente difícil. El cuidado lleva a más compartir, lo que, a su vez, conduce a más gratitud y más cuidado en un virtuoso ciclo.158 Cuidar de alguien también nos da el deseo de mantener la relación con esa persona. Si me importas, quiero mantenerme en amistad contigo. Ese deseo, a su vez, proporciona un ímpetu agregado tanto para buscar como para ofrecer perdón cuando surge la necesidad, creando otro ciclo virtuoso.159

El cuidado que encaja en este ciclo es más personal que anónimo. Lisa Stevenson distingue entre cuidado personal y anónimo. Ella contrasta la “biopolítica”. . . como la atención y gobernanza que se ocupa principalmente del mantenimiento de la vida en sí misma y se dirige a las poblaciones en lugar de a las personas “con” la atención como la forma en que alguien llega a la materia y la ética correspondiente de atender a la otra persona que importa “.160 Ella dice que el primer tipo de cuidado fue anónimo, explicando que “en una burocracia se supone que las decisiones se basan en reglas en lugar de relaciones, y los tomadores de decisiones a menudo siguen los protocolos en lugar de su propio sentido del derecho”, 161 y eso “en formas anónimas de cuidado, supone que las conexiones personales deben ser suprimidas “.162 Para ella, “el cuidado anónimo se ocupa más de lo que es un ser humano que de quién”. 163 En el cuidado personal, en contraste, “la vida como abstracción tiene poco valor, pero las relaciones específicas con los demás, tanto muertas como vivas” importan profundamente “. 164 Ella pregunta:” ¿Qué es la amistad si no es la voluntad de actuar de manera interesada en nombre de un amigo? “165 Como una interacción cara a cara es siempre con otra persona en particular, el cuidado personal siempre se relaciona con un amigo en particular. Esa persona nos importa. Como organización, Tandana debe equilibrar el cuidado personal, para mostrar a sus socios que son importantes, con políticas y criterios que ofrecen una medida de imparcialidad y previenen conflictos de interés inapropiados.

Compasión

Cuidar con respeto lleva a la compasión. 166 Como Palmer señala, “La Compasión significa, literalmente, la capacidad de estar con el sufrimiento de otro”. 167 Para estar con el sufrimiento de otro, ambos debemos preocuparnos por el otro lo suficiente como para estar dispuestos a sufrir por su bien y respetar lo suficiente como para vernos a nosotros mismos en el mismo nivel. Como argumenta Palmer:

Esa es siempre nuestra tentación cuando nos proponemos hacer el bien, hacerlo de una manera que nos deje por encima de la refriega. Pero nuestro deseo de permanecer por encima de todo esto revela nuestra falta de comprensión de la acción correcta. La acción que nos aleja del “otro” nunca puede ser correcta; no podemos hacer nada al retroceder y tirar de palancas que arrojan recompensas a las personas que lo necesitan. La acción correcta puede ser solo una inmersión de nosotros mismos en la realidad, una inmersión que nos involucra en la relación, que nos lleva a nuestro lugar en la naturaleza orgánica de las cosas.168

La compasión “significa estar allí de la manera que sea posible, compartir las circunstancias de la vida de otro tanto como se pueda, no para aumentar el nivel de sufrimiento del mundo, sino para obtener una comprensión íntima de lo que el otro requiere”. 169 Según Palmer, “[T] aquí no hay una ‘solución’ para el sufrimiento, y las personas que lo ofrecen solo aumentan el dolor. Pero hay consuelo e incluso sanación en presencia de personas que saben cómo estar con los demás, cómo estar plenamente allí “. 170 Además, en su opinión, “el sufrimiento nunca puede ser resuelto. Solo se puede compartir en compasión, en comunidad y en todos los esfuerzos para ponernos a cargo del socorro que debilita la mera participación en la que reside nuestra esperanza ”. 171 Cuando cuidamos y respetamos a las personas, nos abstenemos de intentar solucionar los problemas o de encargarnos de mejorar sus situaciones. En cambio, los acompañamos, compartiendo experiencias y trabajando juntos.

Antes de siquiera pensar en comenzar con Tandana, traté de sumergirme en una realidad desconocida. Descubrí que al pasar tiempo con mi familia anfitriona en Panecillo aprendí mucho. En los primeros años, a menudo no tenía nada que hacer e intentaba simplemente estar con mi familia anfitriona, lo que me requería desarrollar una mayor paciencia y desechar las actitudes motivadas sobre “perder el tiempo”. En este momento, ante las preocupaciones y penas de mi madre anfitriona, no pude hacer nada para resolverlas, pero sí podría hacerlas un poco más fáciles de soportar. Solo después de pasar mucho tiempo con mis amigos en la comunidad y aprender sobre sus metas y sueños, empecé a pensar en formas de colaborar con ellos con la esperanza de que juntos mejoren las cosas. Cuando fui por primera vez a Mali, llegué a propósito sin un proyecto en mente, buscando aprender y conocer personas y estar con ellos. Sin embargo, era muy difícil simplemente estar con personas sin un rol o estructura. La gente que conocí pensaba que era novedoso y un poco refrescante que, a diferencia de los occidentales con los que estaban familiarizados, no había llegado con un proyecto conjunto en mente, un objetivo para solucionar un problema particular que asumí que tenían. Sin embargo, tampoco sabían qué hacer conmigo, cómo ayudarme o cómo beneficiarse de mi presencia. Me fue difícil soportar la falta de dirección y la falta de estructura para la interacción con las personas, con la falta simultánea de cualquier sentido de valor en lo que estaba haciendo. Fue igualmente difícil para mis anfitriones aguantarme, ya que parecía que no estaba haciendo nada que valiera la pena. Poco a poco, sin embargo, comenzamos a cuidarnos y respetarnos mutuamente, y finalmente esos sentimientos se convirtieron en compasión.

Tandana sigue buscando una manera compasiva de colaborar. A través de sus experiencias con Tandana, los voluntarios a veces llegan a comprender mejor la importancia de estar con los demás, en lugar de intentar ayudar desde arriba. Para Susie Anderson, una voluntaria de Minnesota, una experiencia en Tandana la ayudó a aprender a estar con la gente, en lugar de solo lograr cosas; ella resaltó, “Me ha hecho disminuir la velocidad y no estar tan motivada por las tareas. Las relaciones son las más importantes ”. 172 J. P. Nelson sintió la importancia de trabajar con personas, en lugar de tratar de ayudarlos; él comentó: “No siento que haya ayudado a nadie más. Más bien, trabajé con personas y, a través de eso, aprendimos, y mis hijos y yo fuimos cambiando “. 173 Maggie Kaus escribió:” La experiencia no parecía que estuviera haciendo trabajo voluntario desde muy lejos, más bien parecía como si lo estuviera haciendo en mi propia comunidad “. 174 Mitzi Moye, quien llevó a varios grupos de estudiantes a trabajar con Tandana, aprecia “la oportunidad de apoyar activamente una excelente base que sé que está arraigada en el respeto y el amor”. 175 Miembros de la comunidad también ven compasión en sus interacciones con Tandana. Segundo Moreta escribió: “Al ver cómo está el mundo hoy, me alegra saber que hay personas que piensan en los demás a costa de su propia salud. . . . Felicitaciones por su incansable trabajo durante los últimos 10 años y su sacrificio por los demás “. 176

Segundo Moreta (derecha)

Seguemo Tembiné, jefe de Kansongho, le dijo a su hijo cuando se acercaba al final de su vida: Los estadounidenses eligieron viajar millones de kilómetros para venir aquí y compartir su amor. Me enorgullece salir con esta buena memoria. Hijo mío, haz todo lo que puedas con los líderes de Tandana para continuar la cooperación entre mi gente y su gente y demostrarle al resto del mundo que el amor de Tandana por su vecino no conoce fronteras geográficas.177

Seguemo Tembiné

153 Ibid.

154 Ibid.

155 Ibid.

156 Arrow 23 on the diagram.

157 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

158 Arrows 24, 16, and 23 on the diagram.

159 Arrows 25, 26, 17, and 23 on the diagram.

160 Stevenson, Lisa, Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic (Oakland: University of California Press, 2014), 3.

161 Ibid., 60.

162 Ibid., 85.

163 Ibid., 107.

164 Ibid., 125.

165 Ibid., 76.

166 Arrows 27 and 28 on the diagram.

167 Palmer, Parker, The Active Life, 83.

168 Ibid., 84.

169 Ibid.

170 Ibid., 84-85.

171 Ibid., 97.

172 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

173 Ibid.

174 Ibid.

175 Ibid.

176 Ibid.

Français

Garder y La compassion: Partie 9

Le projet de développement comme tentative de «faire avancer» toutes les sociétés dans un continuum supposé est injustifiable. Et pourtant, il y a beaucoup de travail important à faire qui ressemble beaucoup au “développement”. Sans théorie du développement comme cadre directeur, pourquoi faisons-nous ce travail? J’ai essayé d’expliquer les fondements philosophiques du travail de Tandana, en décrivant comment ils conduisaient au travail que nous faisons, mais surtout, à la façon dont nous faisons ce travail.

Dans une série d’articles que vous trouverez ici, j’illustrerai comment les principes sur lesquels Tandana est fondée se concrétisent par des discussions sur mes propres expériences ainsi que sur celles de membres de la communauté et de bénévoles qui ont travaillé avec Tandana. Nous voyons comment le fait de s’approcher aux autres avec une approche personnelle conduit, à la fois en théorie et en pratique, à un monde de plus en plus pacifique et plus juste. Cette approche personnelle pourrait non seulement servir d’élan au travail d’une organisation, mais aussi transformer le caractère et les effets d’autres groupes à la recherche de bonnes relations avec les autres. Il s’agit de la neuvième d’une série de 10 publications qui donneront un aperçu à la fois des raisons philosophiques et des effets concrets de la prise de contact avec une approche personnelle.

Si vous avez manqué la Partie 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 et 8, lisez-la ici.

Garder

Les expériences de gratitude mutuelle nous rendent concernés les uns et les autres.156 Les hôtes de Kansongho et les volontaires en visite remplis de gratitude les uns envers les autres sont également venus se soucier les uns des autres. Selon Moussa Tembiné et Timothée Dolo, qui avaient organisé la visite, “pour Kansongho, vous étiez comme de vieux amis. . . Les gens demandent quand aura lieu la prochaine visite de groupe. “ 157 Les volontaires ont montré qu’ils prenaient soin de leurs nouveaux amis en collectant des fonds pour ajouter 16 tonnes de mil à la banque de céréales du village afin d’aider les habitants de Kansongho à traverser une sécheresse particulièrement difficile. Les soins entraînent plus de partage, ce qui entraîne à son tour plus de gratitude et plus de soin dans un cercle vertueux .158

Prendre soin de quelqu’un nous donne également le désir de maintenir une relation avec cette personne. Si je prends soin de toi, je veux rester en amitié avec vous. Ce désir, à son tour, donne une impulsion supplémentaire à la fois à rechercher et à offrir le pardon lorsque le besoin s’en fait sentir, créant ainsi un autre cycle vertueux.159

Le soin qui s’inscrit dans ce cycle est plus personnel qu’anonyme. Lisa Stevenson fait la distinction entre le soin personnel et le soin anonyme. Elle oppose la “biopolitique”. . . comme l’attention et la gouvernance qui concernent principalement le maintien de la vie elle-même laquelle est dirigée vers les populations au lieu des personnes “avec” l’attention comme la manière dont quelqu’un arrive au sujet et l’éthique correspondante d’assister à l’autre personne qui compte. ” 162 Pour elle, “le soin anonyme est plus concerné par ce qu’est un être humain que par qui”. En revanche, dans le soins personnel, “la vie en tant qu’abstraction a peu de valeur, mais les relations spécifiques avec des personnes, mortes ou vivantes” ont une importance capitale 164. Elle demande: “Qu’est-ce que l’amitié si ce n’est la volonté d’agir de manière intéressée au nom d’un ami? 165 Comme la mesure où une interaction face à face a toujours lieu avec une autre personne en particulier, le soin personnel concerne toujours un ami en particulier. Cette personne compte pour nous. Comme organisation, Tandana doit équilibrer le soin personnel, montrer à ses partenaires qu’ils sont importants, avec des politiques et des critères qui offrent une mesure d’impartialité et préviennent les conflits d’intérêts inappropriés.

La compassion

Prendre soin avec respect mène à la compassion. 166 Comme le souligne Palmer, “Compassion signifie littéralement la capacité d’être avec la souffrance d’autrui”. 167 Pour vivre avec la souffrance d’un autre, nous devons tous deux nous soucier suffisamment l’un de l’autre pour vouloir bien souffrir pour leur bien et respecter suffisamment pour se voir au même niveau. Comme le dit Palmer:

C’est toujours notre tentation lorsque nous proposons de faire le bien, de le faire d’une manière qui nous laisse au-dessus de la mêlée. Mais notre désir de rester au-dessus de tout cela révèle notre manque de compréhension de la bonne action. L’action qui nous éloigne de “l’autre” ne peut jamais être correcte; nous ne pouvons rien faire en revenant en arrière et en tirant des leviers qui offrent des récompenses aux personnes qui en ont besoin. La bonne action peut n’être qu’une immersion de nous-mêmes dans la réalité, une immersion qui nous implique dans la relation, qui nous amène à notre place dans la nature organique des choses.168

La compassion “signifie être là de toutes les manières possibles, en partageant autant que possible les circonstances de la vie d’autrui, non pour augmenter le niveau de souffrance du monde, mais pour acquérir une compréhension intime de ce que l’autre a besoin”. 169 Selon Palmer, “il n’existe pas de” solution “pour la souffrance et les personnes qui l’offrent ne font qu’accroître la souffrance. Mais il y a du réconfort et même de la guérison en présence de personnes qui savent comment être avec les autres, comment y être pleinement. “170 En outre, à son avis,” la souffrance ne peut jamais être résolue. Il ne peut être partagé que par la compassion, la communauté et tous les efforts pour nous charger de secours qui affaiblissent la simple participation dans laquelle réside notre espoir. ” 171 Lorsque nous prenons soin des personnes et les respectons, nous nous abstenons d’essayer de résoudre des problèmes ou de prendre en charge l’amélioration de leur situation. Au lieu de cela, nous les accompagnons, partageant des expériences et travaillant ensemble.

Avant même de penser à commencer avec Tandana, j’ai essayé de me plonger dans une réalité inconnue. J’ai découvert qu’en passant du temps avec ma famille d’accueil à Panecillo, j’ai beaucoup appris. Dans les premières années, je n’avais souvent rien à faire et j’essayais simplement de faire partie de la famille d’accueil, ce qui m’obligeait à développer une plus grande patience et à abandonner les attitudes motivées au sujet du “temps perdu”. À ce moment-là, étant donné les soucis et les chagrins de ma mère d’accueil, je ne pouvais rien faire pour les résoudre, mais je pouvais les rendre un peu plus faciles à supporter. Ce n’est qu’après avoir passé beaucoup de temps avec mes amis de la communauté et avoir pris connaissance de leurs objectifs et de leurs rêves que j’ai commencé à réfléchir aux moyens de collaborer avec eux dans l’espoir qu’ensemble, ils amélioreraient les choses. Quand je suis allé au Mali pour la première fois, je suis venu volontairement sans projet, cherchant à apprendre, à rencontrer des gens et à être avec eux. Cependant, il était très difficile d’être simplement avec des personnes sans rôle ni structure. Les personnes que je connu pensaient que c’était nouveau et un peu rafraîchissant. Contrairement aux Occidentaux avec lesquels ils étaient familiers, je n’avais pas pensé à un projet commun, à un objectif visant à résoudre un problème particulier que je pensais avoir. Cependant, ils ne savaient pas non plus quoi faire avec moi, comment m’aider ou comment se bénéficier de ma présence. Il était difficile pour moi de supporter le manque de direction et le manque de structure pour l’interaction avec les gens, avec l’absence simultanée de tout sens de la valeur dans ce que je faisais. Il était tout aussi difficile pour mes hôtes de me supporter, car il me semblait que je ne faisais rien de valable.

Petit à petit, cependant, nous avons commencé à prendre soin de nous et à nous respecter, et ces sentiments sont finalement devenus de la compassion. Tandana continue de rechercher un moyen empreint de compassion pour collaborer. Grâce à leurs expériences avec Tandana, les volontaires en viennent parfois à mieux comprendre l’importance d’être avec d’autres, au lieu d’essayer d’aider d’en haut. Pour Susie Anderson, une volontaire du Minnesota, une expérience chez Tandana l’a aidée à apprendre à être avec les gens, au lieu d’accomplir des choses; Elle a souligné: “Cela m’a fait ralentir et ne plus être motivé par des tâches, les relations sont les plus importantes.” 172 J. P. Nelson a senti l’importance de travailler avec les gens au lieu d’essayer de les aider; Il a commenté: “Je ne pense pas avoir aidé quelqu’un d’autre, mais plutôt, j’ai travaillé avec des gens et, grâce à cela, nous avons appris, et mes enfants et moi avons changé.” 173 Maggie Kaus a écrit: “L’expérience ne m’a pas semblé faire du bénévolat de loin, mais plutôt comme si je le faisais dans ma propre communauté.” 174 Mitzi Moye, qui a dirigé plusieurs groupes d’étudiants pour travailler avec Tandana, apprécie “l’opportunité de soutenir activement une excellente fondation qui, je le sais, est ancrée dans le respect et l’amour.” Les membres de la communauté ressentent également de la compassion dans leurs interactions avec Tandana. Segundo Moreta a écrit: “En voyant le monde d’aujourd’hui, je suis heureux de savoir qu’il y a des gens qui pensent aux autres au détriment de leur propre santé. . . . Félicitations pour votre travail infatigable au cours des 10 dernières années et votre sacrifice pour les autres. “176

Segundo Moreta (a droite)

Seguemo Tembiné, directeur de Kansongho, a déclaré à son fils quand il était sur le point de finir sa vie: Les Américains ont choisi de voyager des millions de kilomètres pour venir ici et partager leur amour. Je suis fier de sortir avec ce bon souvenir. Mon fils, fais tout ce que tu peux avec les dirigeants de Tandana pour poursuivre la coopération entre les miens et leurs peuples et montrer au reste du monde que l’amour de Tandana pour son prochain ne connaît pas de frontières géographiques.177

Seguemo Tembiné

153 Ibid.

154 Ibid.

155 Ibid.

156 Arrow 23 on the diagram.

157 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

158 Arrows 24, 16, and 23 on the diagram.

159 Arrows 25, 26, 17, and 23 on the diagram.

160 Stevenson, Lisa, Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic (Oakland: University of California Press, 2014), 3.

161 Ibid., 60.

162 Ibid., 85.

163 Ibid., 107.

164 Ibid., 125.

165 Ibid., 76.

166 Arrows 27 and 28 on the diagram.

167 Palmer, Parker, The Active Life, 83.

168 Ibid., 84.

169 Ibid.

170 Ibid., 84-85.

171 Ibid., 97.

172 The Tandana Foundation, “What People Say About Their Experience,” accessed May 16, 2018 (http://tandanafoundation.org/testimonials.html).

173 Ibid.

174 Ibid.

175 Ibid.

176 Ibid.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s